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2
Leaf from a large Carolingian Homiliary, in Latin, manuscript on vellum [France, second half of the ninth century]
SALTAR AL LOTE
2
Leaf from a large Carolingian Homiliary, in Latin, manuscript on vellum [France, second half of the ninth century]
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

Leaf from a large Carolingian Homiliary, in Latin, manuscript on vellum [France, second half of the ninth century]

a leaf, 303mm. by 201mm., containing remains of two columns of 35 lines in black ink in a large and skilled Carolingian minuscule, with a pronounced st-ligature and a 'g' with a nearly closed tail-loop, recovered from a binding and hence some small scuffs to verso, but generally magnificent script in superb condition


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Nota del catálogo

This leaf presents a number of questions. There are clear links between the text here and that edited by Migne for Haimo of Auxerre (cf. the text on the recto here, "Bonum quippe sine malo esse potest, malum vero sine bono esse non potest; quia privatio boni ..." with the identical text in Migne, Pat. Lat.118, p.328c, Haimo's homily on the Passion of Christ; where Migne rests only on the printed edition of Johannes Prael, Cologne, 1536). However, there are numerous differences between the texts, and we may have here a fragment of the same text as in Yale, Beinecke, MS 484.12, two leaves of c.1100, which contain homilies which are very close but not exactly the same as those recorded by Migne for Haimo on John 2.1-11 and Matt. 8.1.

Haimo of Auxerre (fl.840-50, d. perhaps as late as 875) was a giant of the Carolingian Renaissance, who has been all but lost to us. He was a fellow student of Hrabanus Maurus (d.856), and studied under the Irish grammarian and court-scholar Murethach (fl. c.840). He taught at the celebrated school of St-Germain at Auxerre, producing a number of illustrious students and numerous writings. These apparent variants on his homilies perhaps date to his lifetime or the decades following, and may represent another recension missed by Migne, or the work of one of his students.

Western and Oriental Manuscripts

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