Works by Renowned Artists Just a Click Away

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Adding to your collection has never been easier. Sotheby’s is delighted to offer exciting, fresh-to-market works by Andy Warhol, Jules Olitski, George Condo, Tracey Emin, Norman Bluhm, Raymond Pettibon and many more in our Contemporary Art Online auction, 16–30 September. Our online platform makes it easy to bid on your own schedule, anytime and anywhere, for two full weeks. The sale is a unique opportunity to acquire art by blue-chip and emerging artists at accessible price points. Click ahead for six highlights, and to see the works firsthand, please visit our York Avenue galleries 21–30 September. We invite you to click, bid and buy!

Contemporary Art Online
Online | 16–30 September 2016

Works by Renowned Artists Just a Click Away

  • Norman Bluhm, Untitled, 1960, $10,000–15,000
    Norman Bluhm, an influential figure in American abstract painting, settled in New York upon his return to the United States in 1956 after spending several years in Paris. His work of this period was strongly influenced both stylistically and conceptually by the action painting of the Abstract Expressionists. Bluhm’s Untitled is a powerfully energetic example of the artist’s work from the early 1960s.

  • David Hockney, Study of Dancer I, II, III and IV, 1981, $12,000–18,000
    Few visual artists in the past century have made such significant contributions to stage and theatre design than David Hockney. These beautiful drawings, Study of Dancer I, II, III, and IV,  illustrate the artist’s preparatory work for one of his most ambitious theatrical projects: the triple bill of Igor Stravinsky’s ballet Le Sacre du Printemps, Le Rossignol and Oedipus Rex for the New York Metropolitan Opera House. 

  • Jack Youngerman, Yellow Rising, 1970, $20,000–30,000
    This large-scale work is a particularly vibrant example of Jack Youngerman’s abstract geometric paintings. The bright colours, clean contours and defined shapes simultaneously evoke Henri Matisse’s cutouts as well as Ellsworth Kelly’s panel pieces. This work presents a unique opportunity for buyers to acquire the largest Youngerman that has ever come to auction.

  • Richard Diebenkorn, Seated Nude, 1967, $18,000–25,000
    During his renowned career, Diebenkorn oscillated between figurative and non-figurative genres. Even the artist’s most abstract compositions, such as those from his Ocean Park series, are grounded in representational and landscape structure. The ability to synchronize the two approaches is demonstrated in Seated Nude from 1967, which presents an intimate depiction of a young woman sitting in an abstract setting that is framed by vertical lines, suggesting a representational structure.

  • Ed Paschke, Rio Negro, 1980, $15,000–20,000
    Ed Paschke was a key figure of the Chicago Imagists movement, a group known for their representational compositions that fused popular culture, marginalized subcultures and wondrous elements. As evident in his 1980 painting Rio Negro, Paschke favored bold, psychedelic colours over dark backgrounds and slightly sinister imagery. As his former student Jeff Koons recalled, “His paintings are like drugs, but in a good way: they are among the strongest physical images that I’ve ever seen. They affect you neurologically.” 

  • Raymond Pettibon, Untitled (Vavoom), 1988, $8,000–12,000
    Raymond Pettibon’s inimitable mark-making and use of language offer viewers a distinct commentary on contemporary culture and politics. The present work is a wonderful example of the artist’s acclaimed practice, which will be the subject of a major survey opening at New York’s New Museum in February 2017.

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