Remarkably Rare Early American Coins

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From the first silver dollar struck for circulation in 1794, to the first eagle (ten dollar gold piece) struck in 1795, Part II of the D. Brent Pogue Collection sale features a splendid array of rare coins. Click through the slideshow to discover a few highlights from this remarkable sale.

Stack’s Bowers Galleries The D. Brent Pogue Collection: Masterpieces of United States Coinage Part II

30 September | New York

Remarkably Rare Early American Coins

  • The Lord St. Oswald 1794 Silver Dollar. Estimate: $3,000,000–5,000,000.
    The finest known example of the first United States Silver Dollar made for circulation. With an impeccable, unbroken, provenance back to 1794-95.

  • 1795 Eagle (10 dollar gold piece). Estimate: $750,000–1,200,000.
    The most perfectly preserved 18th century United States gold coin in existence.

  • 1795 Half Eagle (5 dollar gold piece). Estimate: $350,000–450,000.
    One of the finest surviving examples of the first gold coin struck by the United States.

  • 1795 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar. Estimate: $600,000–800,000.
    The finest 1795 flowing hair silver dollar in existence.

  • 1825 Quarter Eagle (2 ½ dollar gold piece). Estimate: $350,000–450,000.
    The finest known example the entire design motif; finer than the example in the Smithsonian Institution collection.

  • 1822 Proof Half Dollar. Estimate: $75,000–125,000.
    The finest of only two examples known to exist, with a provenance reaching back a century and a quarter.

  • 1798 Half Eagle (5 dollar gold piece) with Small Eagle. Estimate: $550,000–750,000.
    The finest known example of the greatest rarity of the design; formerly in the collection of King Farouk of Egypt.

  • 1838 Quarter Eagle (2 ½ dollar gold piece). Estimate: $75,000–125,000.
    The finest surviving example of the Classic Head quarter eagle design, regardless of date.

  • The Lord St. Oswald 1795 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar. Estimate: $500,000–700,000.
    Acquired in the United States between May and July 1795, by visiting Englishman William Strickland, a correspondent of both Washington and Jefferson.

  • 1804 Eagle (10 dollar gold piece). Estimate: $150,000–225,000.
    One of the finest known examples of the last year of the design; formerly in the collection of FDR’s first Secretary of the Treasury, William Woodin.

  • 1831 Quarter Eagle (2 ½ dollar gold piece). Estimate: $200,000–300,000.
    Once in the renowned Garrett collection; the finest known quarter eagle of its design, with a provenance more than a century and quarter long.

  • 1802/1 Half Eagle (5 dollar gold piece). Estimate $200,000–300,000.
    A pristine example of the heraldic eagle design; once the personal collection of renowned coin dealer, Norman Stack.

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