Old Master Paintings & Works on Paper Day Auction

Old Master Paintings & Works on Paper Day Auction

View full screen - View 1 of Lot 273. Two Studies from nature: Eel Pie House, Twickenham and The Willow  .

Property of the late Mrs Hugh Linnell (1938-2023)

John Linnell, R.A.

Two Studies from nature: Eel Pie House, Twickenham and The Willow

No reserve

Lot Closed

July 4, 11:55 AM GMT

Estimate

4,000 - 6,000 GBP

Lot Details

Description

Property of the late Mrs Hugh Linnell (1938-2023)


John Linnell, R.A.

London 1792 - 1882 Redhill

Two studies from nature: Eel Pie House, Twickenham and The Willow 


both bearing inscriptions verso, the first: Eel Pye [sic] House, Twickenham / ? 1806 / by John Linnell, the second: Study from Nature / by John Linnell / ? 1806

both oil on board

165 by 255 mm and 255 by 165 mm


(2)

Please note that it has been suggested that the inscription on the reverse of both of these paintings may be by a later hand. The cataloguing has therefore been adapted to: both bearing inscriptions verso, the first: Eel Pye [sic] House, Twickenham / ? 1806 / by John Linnell, the second: Study from Nature / by John Linnell / ? 1806

By descent in the artist’s family 

Reigate, The Town Hall, Samuel Palmer and John Linnell, 1963, no. 31 (Eel Pie Island), no. 32 (Study from nature)

Cambridge, Fitzwilliam & Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, John Linnell, A Centennial Exhibition, 1982-1983, nos. 1 & 2  

John Linnell, who would become one of the leading British painters of the 19th century, was born in 1792 in Bloomsbury, then a run-down area of London. In 1804, showing early promise as a draughtsman, he went to live with and was apprenticed to John Varley (1778-1842), a leading watercolourist, a fashionable drawings master and a friend of William Blake (1757-1827). There, Linnell became friends with William Henry Hunt (1790-1864) and the slightly older William Mulready (1786-1863), and following Varley’s advice to always look to nature, the trio often went on sketching expeditions along the Thames and within the city itself.1


The present two plein air studies date to 1806. The Willow has been compared to William Henry Hunt’s Study from Nature at Twickenham, which is now held at Tate Britain.2

 

 

1.     In his ‘Autobiographical Notes’ he writes ‘Hunt and I were always out, weather permitted, painting in oil on millboard from nature.’ See K. Crouan, John Linnell, A Centennial Exhibition, London 1982, p. 1

2.     Tate Britain, inv. 1154