View full screen - View 1 of Lot 174. Very Fine and Rare William and Mary Line-and-Berry-Inlaid Walnut Two-Part Chest of Drawers, Delaware River Valley, possibly Philadelphia, Circa 1720.
174

Very Fine and Rare William and Mary Line-and-Berry-Inlaid Walnut Two-Part Chest of Drawers, Delaware River Valley, possibly Philadelphia, Circa 1720

Very Fine and Rare William and Mary Line-and-Berry-Inlaid Walnut Two-Part Chest of Drawers, Delaware River Valley, possibly Philadelphia, Circa 1720

Very Fine and Rare William and Mary Line-and-Berry-Inlaid Walnut Two-Part Chest of Drawers, Delaware River Valley, possibly Philadelphia, Circa 1720

Very Fine and Rare William and Mary Line-and-Berry-Inlaid Walnut Two-Part Chest of Drawers

Delaware River Valley, possibly Philadelphia

Circa 1720


Upper portion of feet replaced.

Height 40 1/2 in. by Width 42 3/4 in. by Depth 23 3/4 in.

Feet replaced with new upper front foot sections made. Large patch on one drawer with several other patches to drawer fronts. Period escutcheons, cast brass pulls moved and original holes patched. Front edge of top patched, banding and inlay repairs, re-constructions. Inner edges of single arch moldings patched. Drawer blades replaced. Rear stiles patched and extended, one made to match. New lower back panel match color and finish.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

An early Byberry, Pennsylvania area family that relocated to New York State;
Bernard and S. Dean Levy Inc., New York.
Jack L. Lindsey, Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, 1680-1758, (Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1999), pp. 130, 142, no. 28, fig. 191;
Peter Kenny, "Ark of the Covenant: The Remarkable Inlaid Cedar Scrutoir from the Brinckerhoff Family of Newtown, Long Island," American Furniture 2014, ed. Luke Beckerdite, (Milwaukee, WI: Chipstone Foundation, 2014), pp. 19-20, figs. 24 and 25;
Jeanmarie Andrews. “Line and Berry Furniture.” Early American Life (May/June 2021): p. 31;
Christopher Storb, "Lines and Dots," In Proportion to the Trouble, October 25, 2021 [https://cstorb.com/2021/10/25/lines-and-dots/].
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, 1680-1758, October 1999-January 2000.

With its case elaborately ornamented with tulips, scrolling vines and berry cluster inlays, this chest is representative of the line-and-berry inlaid furniture made in Southeastern Pennsylvania during the early eighteenth century. It is made of black walnut with hard pine and Atlantic white cedar secondary woods.


Christopher Storb includes this chest in his recent article “Lines and Dots” and identifies it as part of a subset of line-and-berry furniture that may have been made in the Delaware River Valley and possibly Philadelphia rather than Chester County. The high chest in the du Pont Collection is also part of this group (lot 505). Both case pieces display secondary woods seen in documented Philadelphia furniture as well as four berry clusters and inlay designs made with numerous compass settings. See Christopher Storb, “Lines and Dots,” October 25, 2021 https://cstorb.com/2021/10/25/lines-and-dots/


This chest was included in the Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, 1680-1758 exhibition held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from October 10, 1999 – January 2, 2000 and illustrated in the accompanying catalogue. An early William and Mary walnut chest of similar form with a two-part divided case and four graduated drawers may represent the same shop tradition. It was also featured in the Worldly Goods exhibition.1 It is similarly constructed with related molding profiles and case divisions as the present chest. Both were made to be easily transportable with an upper case that is held in place by a narrow upward-projecting tenon inset in the side frame of the lower case. The sides have panels-in-stiles set horizontally and positioned one over the other. The upper panels of the present chest have an applied stile which divides each into two rectangle panels. Reflecting the variations of regional craftsmanship of the period, this chest has ball feet while the other chest has brush feet and lacks line-and-berry inlay.


1 Lindsey, Jack L. Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, 1680-1758 (Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1999): fig. 192, p. 130 and no. 27, p. 142.