View full screen - View 1 of Lot 1039. Very Rare Pair of Queen Anne Carved and Figured Walnut Compass-Seat Side Chairs, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1735.
1039

Very Rare Pair of Queen Anne Carved and Figured Walnut Compass-Seat Side Chairs, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1735

Estimate:

20,000 - 30,000 USD

Very Rare Pair of Queen Anne Carved and Figured Walnut Compass-Seat Side Chairs, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1735

Very Rare Pair of Queen Anne Carved and Figured Walnut Compass-Seat Side Chairs, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1735

Estimate:

20,000 - 30,000 USD

Bid:

9,500

USD

Live auction begins in:

Live auction begins in:

3 days, 4 hours

3 days, 4 hours

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Very Rare Pair of Queen Anne Carved and Figured Walnut Compass-Seat Side Chairs

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Circa 1735


Chairs marked II and VI with their respective seat frames marked III and V. Patches to seat rail veneer and splat; two leg returns replaced.

Height 40 5/8 inches

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact americana@sothebys.com.

 

The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Joe Kindig Jr. and Son, York, Pennsylvania;
William Clarke;
Mary Cook, Pennsylvania;
Sotheby's, New York, Fine Americana, January 28-30, 1994, sale 6482, lot 1057.
Joseph K. Kindig III, The Philadelphia Chair 1685-1785, (York, PA: Historical Society of York County, 1978), no. 65.
These important side chairs represent one of the earliest expressions of Queen Anne seating furniture from eighteenth century Philadelphia. With their turned rear stretcher and a half dovetail joinery securing the front legs they relate directly to the construction of chairs made in Ireland. Three other directly related sets of chairs are known. Two of which have Logan family history associated with them. James Logan was born in Belfast, Ireland. One related pair of chairs is in the collection of Stenton (see Philip D. Zimmerman, "Eighteenth-Century Chairs at Stenton," The Magazine Antiques (May 2003), pp. 122, pl. I and Philip Zimmerman, "The "Boston Chairs" of Mid-Eighteenth-Century Philadelphia," American Furniture 2009, ed. Luke Beckerdite, (Milwaukee, WI: Chipstone Foundation, 2009), p. 153, fig. 16).  The other Logan variant is in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (see Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley, American Furniture 1650-1840: Highlights from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020), p. 54, no. 16).  The last set with veneered rails was sold at Sotheby's, New York, Important Americana, including Silver, Flags, Folk Art & Furniture, May 23, 2002, lot 294.  Other related chairs lacking veneer are illustrated in Albert Sack, Fine Point of Furniture: Early American, (New York: Crown Publishers, Inc, 1950), p. 25 and an armchair in Albert Sack, New Fine Points: Early American, (New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1993), p. 28.