View full screen - View 1 of Lot 1157. Very Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Open Armchair, Attributed to Daniel Trottier, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1785.
1157

Very Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Open Armchair, Attributed to Daniel Trottier, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1785

Estimate:

8,000 - 12,000 USD

Very Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Open Armchair, Attributed to Daniel Trottier, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1785

Very Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Open Armchair, Attributed to Daniel Trottier, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1785

Estimate:

8,000 - 12,000 USD

Bid:

4,800

USD

Live auction begins in:

Live auction begins in:

3 days, 7 hours

3 days, 7 hours

Authenticity guarantee

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Very Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Open Armchair

Attributed to Daniel Trottier, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Circa 1785


Height 39 in. by Width 24 in. by Depth 19 3/4 in.

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact americana@sothebys.com.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Joseph Kindig, Jr., York, Pennsylvania;

Mr. & Mrs. Bertram D. Coleman, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania;

Christie's New York, TheCollection of Mr. & Mrs. Bertram D. Coleman, January 16, 1998, lot 261;

Leigh Keno American Antiques, New York;

Sotheby's New York, Important Americana from a Private Collection, January 22, 2011, lot 2;

Private Collection;

Sotheby's New York, Important Americana, January 24, 2014, sale 9100, lot 341.

Anne Castrodale, "Daniel Trotter: Eighteenth-Century Philadelphia Cabinetmaker," Winterthur Portfolio 6, Charlottesville, 1970, 151-184;
Lita Solis-Cohen, "Living with Antiques: The Bryn Mawr home of Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Dawson Coleman," Magazine Antiques (April 1966), p. 573;
The Decorative Arts Photographic Collection, Winterthur Museum, no. 66.1708;
Philadelphia: Three Centuries of American Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1976, cat. no. 117.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia: Three Centuries of American Art, April-October 1976.

The unique carved slat-back chairs centering pierced foliate carved embellishments and foliate carved corners are distinctive characteristics of the cabinetmaker, Daniel Trotter (1747-1800). Born in Philadelphia in 1747 to the Quaker shoemaker William Trotter and his wife Elizabeth, Daniel Trotter completed his apprenticeship to William Wayne in 1768 and was working independently by 1769. He established a partnership with John Webb in 1771 and dissolved it three years later. He opened his first shop on Water Street soon after his marriage to Rebecca Conarroe on November 9, 1773.


The only documented furniture that can be traced to Daniel Trotter’s shop are two Demilune ends to a dining table, a semicircular bureau, four bedsteads and two sets of chairs made for Stephen Girard between 1786-1796. Trotter’s innovative and elegant design for his slat back chairs is not found on any English or American counterparts. Based on this unique design, many chairs have been attributed to him including an armchair and side chair in private collections illustrated by William M. Hornor;1 a side chair in the American Museum in Britain;2 a side chair at Winterthur;3 and a side chair formerly in the collection of George Lorimer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.4


1 See William M. Hornor, Blue Book Philadelphia Furniture, 1935, pls. 367 and 368.

2 See Helen Comstock, American Furniture, Exton, PA, 1962, no. 282.

3 See Charles Montgomery, American Furniture: The Federal Period (New York, 1966): no. 82, pp. 137.

4 See Morrison Heckscher, American Furniture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1985, no. 62, pp. 109-10.