View full screen - View 1 of Lot 1083. Very Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table, Case attributed to Thomas Tufft (1740-1788), Carving attributed to John Pollard (1740-1787), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1765.
1083

Very Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table, Case attributed to Thomas Tufft (1740-1788), Carving attributed to John Pollard (1740-1787), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1765

Estimate:

5,000 - 8,000 USD

Very Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table, Case attributed to Thomas Tufft (1740-1788), Carving attributed to John Pollard (1740-1787), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1765

Very Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table, Case attributed to Thomas Tufft (1740-1788), Carving attributed to John Pollard (1740-1787), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Circa 1765

Estimate:

5,000 - 8,000 USD

Bid:

3,000

USD

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Live auction begins in:

3 days, 4 hours

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Very Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table

Case attributed to Thomas Tufft (1740-1788), Carving attributed to John Pollard (1740-1787)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Circa 1765


Three legs replaced.

Height 33 1/4 in. by Width 34 1/4 in. by Depth 20 in.

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact americana@sothebys.com.

 

The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Found in a hunting lodge near Inverness, Scotland;
Richard Trentini;
Sotheby’s, Important American Furniture, Folk Art and Folk Paintings, October 25, 1992, sale 6350, lot 355.

This dressing tables shares many construction characteristics with the labeled Thomas Tufft dressing table in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (acc. no. 1955-87-1) (see Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley, American Furniture 1650-1840: Highlights from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020), p. 116-7, no. 84). The leg carving matches that on the labeled Thomas Tufft pair of chairs at the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum (acc. no. 1957.0514) (see Joseph Downs, American Furniture: Queen Anne and Chippendale Periods, in the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum (1952), no. 134, 390 [label]).


Rather than a shell surrounded by acanthus leafage found on the drawers of most dressing tables of the period, this one exhibits the extremely rare detail of unusual applied carving of Gothic arches below a framework of trailing foliage, a design likely taken from a fashionable English pattern book. Only four other Philadelphia case pieces are known with Gothic carving of this type. A dressing table illustrated by William M. Hornor in Blue Book Philadelphia Furniture as the property of Dr. and Mrs. John B. Carson was sold at Sotheby’s, The Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Jeffords, October 28-9, 2004, sale 8016, lot 366. It was sold together with the high chest of drawers made en suite. Another dressing table with a Gothic drawer was sold at Sotheby’s, New York, Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints And Carpets including Property Sold by the Philadelphia Museum Of Art, January 26, 2013, sale 8950, lot 419. A third example is illustrated in Luke Vincent Lockwood, Colonial Furniture in America, (New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1913), p. 113, fig. 112 and is now in the collection Washington’s Headquarters at Ford Mansion in Morristown, New Jersey. The fourth is in a private collection.


The matching high chest base was illustrated in a Henry Weil advertisement, Magazine Antiques, vol. 13, no. 1, January 1928, p. 18.