View full screen - View 1 of Lot 16. An important pietra dura panel depicting a Landscape with a village beside a river | Un important panneau en pierres dures représentant un Paysage avec une chapelle et village au bord d'une rivière.
16

Attributed to Cosimo Castrucci (1536-1636), Imperial Workshop of the Emperor Rudolf II, Prague, circa 1600-1611

An important pietra dura panel depicting a Landscape with a village beside a river | Un important panneau en pierres dures représentant un Paysage avec une chapelle et village au bord d'une rivière

Collection Antony Embden | Trésors de la Renaissance

Attributed to Cosimo Castrucci (1536-1636), Imperial Workshop of the Emperor Rudolf II, Prague, circa 1600-1611

Attributed to Cosimo Castrucci (1536-1636), Imperial Workshop of the Emperor Rudolf II, Prague, circa 1600-1611

An important pietra dura panel depicting a Landscape with a village beside a river | Un important panneau en pierres dures représentant un Paysage avec une chapelle et village au bord d'une rivière

An important pietra dura panel depicting a Landscape with a village beside a river | Un important panneau en pierres dures représentant un Paysage avec une chapelle et village au bord d'une rivière

Attributed to Cosimo Castrucci (1536-1636)

Imperial Workshop of the Emperor Rudolf II

Prague, circa 1600-1611

An important pietra dura panel depicting a Landscape with a village beside a river


pietre dure panel, on a slate background; in a gilt-bronze frame

30,5 by 22 cm ; 12 by 8⅔ in.

___________________________________________


Attribué à Cosimo Castrucci (1536-1636)

Atelier Impérial de l'Empereur Rudolph I

Prague, vers 1600-1611

Important panneau en pierres dures représentant un Paysage avec une chapelle et village au bord d'une rivière


marqueterie de pierres dures, sur un fond d'ardoise ; dans un cadre en bronze doré

30,5 x 22 cm ; 12 x 8⅔ in.

This rare pietra dura panel is in very good condition overall.

There are a few very minor losses with some old fillings to the edges of the panel in several places, notably one small loss (ca 1 cm) is visible in the light pink sky to the top right edge, just above the mountain, as well as two very small fillings to the upper edges in the top right corner and one in the top left corner; as well as one small loss in the middle of the left edge of the panel. The giltbronze frame with some minor wear and oxydation.

The panel is set on a slade background, as it is traditionally the case with the Prague pietra dura panels with circular openings where the superfluous glue can evaporate.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

R. Distelberger, Die Kunst des Steinschnitts. Prunkgefässe, Kameen und Commessi aus der Kunstkammer, ex. cat. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, 2002/2003, p. 287-291, no 172.

Related Litterature / Références bibliographiques 
W. Köppe, Art of the Royal Court. Metropolitain Museum, New York, 2008, p. 219-220, no 66.
Prag um 1600, exh. cat. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienne, 1988, pp. 513-515.

This magnificent panel depicting a landscape with a chapel on the banks of a river is wholly characteristic of the pietra dura marquetry produced by Florentine artists in the late sixteenth century in Prague. The Castrucci family, descended from a line of goldsmiths, excelled in this with their virtuoso combinations of variously coloured stones, achieving a great level of detail in their particularly innovative compositions.


After his early years in Vienna, Rudolf II transferred his imperial residence to Prague in 1583. Through his substantial artistic patronage, he turned the city into a dazzling cosmopolitan capital, famed for science and the arts. At his court, Italian painters such as Giuseppe Arcimboldo jostled with Germans like Bartholomeus Spranger, the Flemish sculptor Adriaen de Vries and the landscape painter Roelandt Savery.


In 1592, the Emperor founded an imperial workshop for stone cutters and brought Florentine lapidary artists to the Prague court. He employed three successive generations of the Castrucci family, who were originally from Florence and had trained in the Medici Grand Ducal workshops: Cosimo Castrucci (active 1576 to 1602), whose career as a cutter of semi-precious stones for His Majesty is documented in Prague from 1596, thanks to a signed and dated pietra dura panel which is almost identical to the present example.


His son Giovanni, employed by the Emperor from 1605 to 1622, was appointed Kammer-Edelsteinschneider (master stone cutter) in 1610. At the request of the Medici, he took over the Caroni brothers’ workshop in 1611. His son, Cosimo di Giovanni Castrucci, excelled in rendering perspective and architecture in his compositions. He seems to have been active until 1619/20, when Giuliano di Pietro Pandolfini (1615–1637) took over the Castrucci workshop. The Medici had a particular diplomatic interest in nurturing relations with the Habsburgs. A mutual exchange of artisans and artistic techniques was a political instrument to strengthen their ties.


The depiction of landscapes is rare in Florentine pietra dura. The present panel is an example of the early adoption of this technique among the Florentine lapidary artists established in Prague. For these compositions, they took inspiration from German and Dutch painters, such as Pieter Brueghel the Elder (circa 1565; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, inv. no GG 1838), Paul Bril and Pieter Stevens, as well as from the engravings of Johann Saedeler (1550–1600) (circa 1599; Vienna, Albertina, inv. no HB 78,6) and Aegidius Saedeler (1570–1629), some of whose works were present in Rudolf II’s collection.


These panels in polychrome pietra dura, known as ‘commessi’, were made from rare semi-precious stones, mostly found in the region, whose texture helps to enhance the composition: agates, calcedony and jasper from Bohemia were among the most commonly used.


The present panel may be compared to the commesso made by Cosimo Castrucci in 1596, signed and dated Cosimo Castruccj Florentino Fecitt Anno 1596, now in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna (inv. no 3037). The two works, whose compositions are almost identical, testify to the virtuosity of the Florentine lapidary artist: the diagonal formed by the river separates the darker colours of the foreground from the background, which opens out into a clear sky. On the left, a chapel with open arcades stands on a hilltop, and a falconer on horseback can be seen riding along a lane. The tree in the centre and the diagonal of the river emphasise the perspective as well as the division of the composition into two levels. On the opposite bank of the river, reached across a bridge, several villages stand out from the snowy mountains in the distance.


Despite the striking similarity between these two works and their highly skilled execution, Rudolf Distelberger in 2002 (cf. op. cit.), attributed the present panel to Cosimo di Giovanni, the master’s grandson, who worked in the same workshop, supposing a slightly later date, maybe ten years later, circa 1611.


Be that as it may, this takes nothing away from the quality and rarity of this beautiful pietra dura panel.


___________________________________________


Ce magnifique panneau illustrant un paysage avec chapelle au bord d’une rivière est tout à fait caractéristique des marqueteries de pierres dures réalisées par des artistes florentins à la fin du XVIe siècle à Prague. Les Castrucci, issus d’une famille d’orfèvres, excellent par leur virtuosité dans l’assemblage des pierres de couleurs variées avec grande minutie, aboutissant à des compositions particulièrement innovatives.


Après ses débuts à Vienne, Rodolphe II transfère sa résidence impériale en 1583 à Prague. Par son important mécénat artistique, il fait de cette ville une brillante capitale cosmopolite pour les sciences et les arts. A sa cour se côtoyaient des peintres italiens, comme Giuseppe Arcimboldo, et allemands tel Bartholomeus Spranger, le sculpteur flamand Adriaen de Vries et le peintre paysagiste Roelandt Savery.


A partir de 1592, l’Empereur fonde un atelier impérial de tailleurs de pierres et fait venir les lapidaires florentins à la cour de Prague. Il emploie trois générations successives de la famille Castrucci, d’origine florentine, formées dans les Ateliers Grands Ducaux des Médicis : Cosimo Castrucci (actif de 1576-1602), dont l’activité en tant que tailleur de pierres semi-précieuses de Sa Majesté est attestée à partir de 1596 à Prague, grâce à un panneau en pierres dures signé et daté présentant une composition presque identique au nôtre.


Son fils Giovanni, employé par l’Empereur dès 1605 jusqu’en 1622, fut nommé Kammer-Edelsteinschneider (maître de tailleur de pierres) en 1610. A la demande des Médicis, il reprend l’atelier des frères Caroni en 1611. Son fils, Cosimo di Giovanni Castrucci, excelle par les perspectives et architectures dans ses compositions. Il semble être actif jusqu'en 1619/20, lorsque Giuliano di Pietro Pandolfini (1615-1637) reprend l’atelier des Castrucci. Les Médicis avaient notamment un intérêt diplomatique à développer leurs relations avec les Habsbourg. L'échange mutuel d'artisans et de techniques artistiques était un instrument politique pour approfondir leurs liens.


La représentation de paysages est rare dans la marqueterie florentine. Notre panneau illustre le début de cette technique appliquée par les lapidaires florentins installés à Prague. Pour ces compositions, ils s’inspirent des peintres allemands et hollandais, tels Pieter Brueghel l’Ancien, (vers 1565; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien, inv. no GG 1838), Paul Bril, Pieter Stevens ou les gravures de Johann Saedeler (1550-1600) (vers 1599 ; Wien, Albertina, inv. no HB 78,6) et Aegidius Saedeler (1570-1629), dont Rodolphe II possédait des œuvres dans sa collection.


Ces panneaux en pierre dures polychromes, appelés ‘commessi’ sont composées de rares pierres semi-précieuses, pour la plupart originaires de la région, dont la texture contribue à enrichir la composition : agates, calcedoines, et jaspes de Bohème, pour les plus courants.


Notre panneau peut être rapproché du commesso réalisé par Cosimo Castrucci en 1596, signé et daté Cosimo Castruccj Florentino Fecitt Anno 1596 au Kunsthistorisches Museum de Vienne (inv. no 3037). Présentant une composition presque identique, ces deux œuvres témoignent de la virtuosité du lapidaire florentin: une rivière forme une diagonale, séparant le premier plan, dans des couleurs plus sombres, de l’arrière-plan qui s’ouvre sur un ciel éclairé. A gauche, une chapelle aux arcatures ouvertes est érigée sur une colline, et on aperçoit un fauconnier montant son cheval sur le chemin. L’arbre au centre ainsi que le cours de la rivière en diagonale accentuent la perspective, ainsi que la division de la composition en deux niveaux. Sur l’autre rive de la rivière, enjambée par un pont, sont construits plusieurs villages se détachant de montagnes enneigées dans le lointain.


Malgré l’analogie frappante de ces deux œuvres et l’excellence de leur exécution, Rudolf Distelberger, en 2002 (cf. op. cit.), attribue notre panneau à Cosimo di Giovanni, petit-fils du maître, travaillant dans le même atelier, et le date dix années plus tard, vers 1611. Il en demeure pas moins que notre panneau en pierres dures se distingue par sa rareté ainsi que la qualité de son exécution.