View full screen - View 1 of Lot 38. A George II mahogany chest-on-stand, circa 1740.
38

A George II mahogany chest-on-stand, circa 1740

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

2,000 - 4,000 GBP

Property from the Estate of Philip Astley-Jones

A George II mahogany chest-on-stand, circa 1740

A George II mahogany chest-on-stand, circa 1740

Estimate:

2,000 - 4,000 GBP

Lot sold:

5,040

GBP

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Property from the Estate of Philip Astley-Jones

A George II mahogany chest-on-stand, circa 1740


the caddy-moulded top and sides with lacquered brass carrying handles, the stand with two short mahogany lined drawers, the interior lined with contemporary Chinese Export polychrome decorated wallpaper, on cabriole legs with paw feet, the reverse with ink label in manuscript reading 'Ja*** ***shwood [James Dashwood] / att Northbrook / Oxfordshire'

88cm. high, 126cm. wide, 71cm. deep; 2ft. 10¾in., 4ft. 1½in., 2ft. 4in.

A lovely piece of Georgian case furniture in good, conserved condition. Surface with typical old marks, scuffs and scratches consistent with age and use including a notable watermark to top. Small filler and patch repairs around lock site only noticeable under torch light. The Chinese wallpaper lined interior is tired, with splits and foxing as to be expected but retains the vivid colouring and is of great charm. The metalwork apparently original. Some minor chips and losses to beading and moulding of chest and stand. Old repair to veneer at rear edge of right hand return of stand. The characterful paw feet similarly with typical scuffs and scratches.


Please note that Condition 12 of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Probably supplied to Sir James Dashwood, 2nd Bt. (1715–1779) for Northbrook, Oxfordshire and removed to Kirklington Park, Oxfordshire in circa 1750; 
Acquired from Jonathan Fyson, 1989.
This wonderful chest-on-stand, retaining its original Chinese Export wallpaper lining to the interior, was probably supplied to Sir James Dashwood, 2nd Bt. (1715–1779) in the years after he succeeded his grandfather in 1734. Dashwood inherited several estates including his grandfather's house at Northbrook in addition to property from his mother, Dorothea Read, daughter of Sir James Read of Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire. Following an extensive Grand Tour through Italy, France and the Low Countries, Dashwood set about building a new house that properly reflected his wealth and status.

An archetypal gentleman architect, Dashwood was heavily involved in the build and interior decoration of Kirklington Park, and after consulting James Gibbs and Daniel Garrett in the early 1740s he eventually settled on plans by John Sanderson. The foundations were laid in 1742 and the house was habitable, albeit incomplete, by 1746. Northbrook was demolished shortly afterwards, in 1750, and it is likely the present chest was assimilated into the collections at Kirklington shortly thereafter. The interiors at Kirklington represent a rare capsule of neo-Palladian, Baroque and early Rocco design, conceived and executed in one decade, with virtuoso stucco work by Thomas Roberts and the famous painted ceiling of the Small Drawing Room by Andien de Clermont. Payments to William Hallett suggest he supplied much of the furniture at Kirklington, including a set of hooped back dining chairs and an early pair of commodes for the Library in circa 1745 (for one, see E. Lennox-Boyd, Ed., Masterpieces of English Furniture: The Gerstenfeld Collection, Italy, 1999).

Kirklington remained in the Dashwood family until 1909. As a result of several dispersals during the 20th century, the dining room scheme is now preserved in its entirety in the Metropolitan Museum, New York (Acc. No. 32.53.1).