View full screen - View 1 of Lot 155. Samson slaying the Philistines, after Michelangelo (recto and verso).
155

Workshop of Jacopo Tintoretto

Samson slaying the Philistines, after Michelangelo (recto and verso)

Estimate:

4,000 - 6,000 USD

Workshop of Jacopo Tintoretto

Workshop of Jacopo Tintoretto

Samson slaying the Philistines, after Michelangelo (recto and verso)

Samson slaying the Philistines, after Michelangelo (recto and verso)

Estimate:

4,000 - 6,000 USD

Current bid:

3,000

USD

(3 bids, reserve met)

Lot closes:

Lot closes:

1 day, 5 hours

1 day, 5 hours

January 26, 08:20 PM (GMT)

January 26, 08:20 PM (GMT)

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Workshop of Jacopo Tintoretto

Samson slaying the Philistines, after Michelangelo (recto and verso) 


Black chalk heightened with white chalk, on blue paper (recto and verso)

367 by 206 mm; 14½ by 8⅛ in.

Hinge mounted to a modern mount. There is scattered staining and surface dirt to the sheet and four small pin prick holes to the four corners. There is a circular brown stain to the lower centre of the sheet which shows through to the verso. The combination of black chalk and touches of white remains reasonably well preserved throughout and the paper retains much of its original, vibrant blue color. Sold unframed.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Kurt Meissner, Zurich;
Ian Woodner, New York,
his estate sale, London, Christie's, 7 July 1992, lot 15;
with John R. Cassayd-Smith, London,
where acquired by the present owner
Bremen, Kunsthalle, and Zürich, Kunsthaus, Handzeichnungen Alter Meister aus Schweizer Privatbesitz, 1967, cat. no. 73, reproduced figs. 73.a and 73.b (as Jacopo Tintoretto) (exhibition subsequently repeated in Münster, Westfälisches Landesmuseum, and Baden-Baden, Staatliche Kunsthalle);
Stanford, CA, Art Gallery, The Detroit Institute of Arts, and Finch College Museum of Art, New York, Old Master Drawings from the Collection of Kurt Meissner, Zürich, 1969-70, cat. no. 25, reproduced (as Jacopo Tintoretto)

This is one of over thirty known studies by Tintoretto and his studio after a bozzetto of Michelangelo's unexecuted sculpture Samson and the Philistines, designed circa 1530 for the Piazza della Signoria, Florence as a pendant to David.  Although Michelangelo's model does not survive, the sculpture is known from a small group of bronze reproductions. Carlo Ridolfi's biography of Tintoretto states that the artist was given small versions of Michelangelo's Medici Chapel sculptures by Daniele da Volterra, Michelangelo's assistant. It would have been such a replica, or else a clay bozzetto, that Tintoretto used to study.


The sheer number of drawings, their repetitious nature and variations in quality means that deciding which are autograph has proved to be 'a notorious challenge of connoiseurship'.1 Of the twenty-two studies identified by the Tietzes, ten are given to the master himself and twelve to his workshop. Rossi is even more cautious, accepting only seven as Tintoretto and one as 'Attributed to'.3


1. Tintoretto, exhib. cat., Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado 2007, p. 403, cat. nos 55-6

2. See H. Tietze and E. Tietze-Conrat, The Drawings of the Venetian Painters in the 15th and 16th Centuries, New York 1970, pp. 278-303, nos. 1559, 1564, 1566, 1666, 1679, 1707, 1708, 1733, 1734, 1741, 1771, 1772, 1811, 1813, 1814, 1827, 1841, 1842, 1845, 1848, 1860, 1862 

3. Those in the Musée Bonnat, Bayonne (inv. no. 3129), the Courtauld Institute, London (inv. no. 99), the Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen, Berlin (inv. no. 5228), Christ Church, Oxford (inv. no. 0360), the Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam and the two drawings at the Fogg. See Tintorettoloc.cit., note 3