View full screen - View 1 of Lot 5. A pair of George III bronzed Coade stone lamps, late 18th century.
5

A pair of George III bronzed Coade stone lamps, late 18th century

A pair of George III bronzed Coade stone lamps, late 18th century

A pair of George III bronzed Coade stone lamps, late 18th century

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A pair of George III bronzed Coade stone lamps, late 18th century


modelled as Psyche and Hymen, with the base of the Psyche figure stamped Coade, Lambeth

73.5cm high, 38cm. wide, 14cm. deep; 2 ft. 5in., 1ft. 3in., 5½in.

Adapted for electricity and will require re-electrification. Has later shades and nozzles. The bronzed surface is possibly later, and with typical chips and nicks consistent with age and use. Has decorative appeal


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Edward Meldecott, Salcombe Park, Herts;
Christie's, Salcombe Park, 11 October 1993, lot 132;
Sotheby's London, Important English Furniture, 7 July 2000, lot 6 (£9,600 with premium).

Throughout its history spanning from 1769-1840, the Coade factory produced a vast array of products such as architectural and garden ornaments, decorative details, statues and monuments. Their newly invented form of artificial stone, which came to be known as 'Coade stone', was the only kind of artificial stone at the time to be resilient to frost and other forms of harsh outdoor exposure. Eleanor Coade's high standards of design and quality were well recognised by London’s most prominent architects and designers, with commissions coming in from the likes of Robert Adam, James Wyatt, John Nash and Sir John Soane.


The design for the present lot can be seen in a set of etchings by John Bacon RA, and was originally intended for some chimneypiece figures. These were originally made for Norbury Park in the 1780s, and are now in Heaton Hall in Lancashire. The bronze may be later, but could also original due to the general practice of painting over chimneypieces that were not made of marble.