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173

Elie Nadelman

Female Head

Drawn Together: The Collection of Marcia and Stanley Gumberg, featuring Modern Masterworks on Paper

Elie Nadelman

Elie Nadelman

Female Head

Female Head

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Drawn Together: The Collection of Marcia and Stanley Gumberg, featuring Modern Masterworks on Paper

Elie Nadelman

1882 - 1946

Female Head



marble

height: 15⅝ in.

39.8 cm.

Executed circa 1925-30.

The work retains a pattern of pindot impressions throughout the figures face which are original to the work and consistent with the artist's technique. The surface appears to be slightly dirty in select areas with minor traces of dirt in the crevices.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

The artist's son (by descent)
Edward Thorp Gallery, New York (acquired circa 1991)
Acquired from the above in 1994 by the present owner
New York, Edward Thorp Gallery, early 1990s

The dotted impressions seen across the surface of the present work suggest the artist used a pointing machine in producing Female Head, categorizing the work as a unique marble reproduction of an identical plaster model. This is evidenced by the pindot impressions seen throughout the surface of the marble, which retain graphite marks in the crevices. This technique allowed the artist to transfer exact measurements from the plaster model to a corresponding position on the marble block, a lengthy process that created a nearly identical sculpture in exacting size and form. These indented impressions and pencil marks indicate that the marble was possibly unfinished when it was presented among a series of similar marble heads Nadelman produced between 1925-30. A number of these marbles from this period retain the same dotted surface though, suggesting instead that the artist may have been satisfied with the overall state of completion, leaving the work as-is.