View full screen - View 1 of Lot 76. A large famille-verte biscuit figure of a Daoist deity Qing dynasty, Kangxi period | 清康熙 五彩描金道教人物坐像.
76

A large famille-verte biscuit figure of a Daoist deity Qing dynasty, Kangxi period | 清康熙 五彩描金道教人物坐像

A large famille-verte biscuit figure of a Daoist deity Qing dynasty, Kangxi period | 清康熙 五彩描金道教人物坐像

A large famille-verte biscuit figure of a Daoist deity Qing dynasty, Kangxi period | 清康熙 五彩描金道教人物坐像

A large famille-verte biscuit figure of a Daoist deity

Qing dynasty, Kangxi period

清康熙 五彩描金道教人物坐像


raised on a hexagonal pedestal decorated on the front with diaper pattern and on the back with a qilin in a garden

Height 39.3 cm, 15 1/2 in.

the figure: some general wear to the surface, minor chips to the edges and scattered flakes to the enamels including one to the beard hanging on the right side. There are also some old overspray to the top of the head, and short firing lines including a few around the collar.

the stand: there is a chip (ca. 2.3 by 1 cm) to the front edge, an incipient chip to one corner of the top (ca. 4.2 cm wide to the exterior), and a very small chip with an associated hairline (ca. 8 cm long) to the side across. Some further nicks to the edges and general wear to the surface.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Collection of John D. Rockefeller Jr. (1874-1960).

The Metropolitan Museum New York.

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小約翰.戴維森.洛克菲勒(1874至1960年)收藏

紐約大都會博物館

J. F. Blacker, Chats on Oriental China, London, 1919, pl. 75.
Fong Chow, 'Symbolism in Chinese Porcelain: The Rockefeller Bequest', The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Vol. 21, no. 1, 1962, pg. 19, pl. III.
This magnificent figure of a Daoist deity is impressive for its massive size and the vivid coloration of the robe and throne. On account of the third eye in his forehead, the figure can probably be identified as Huaguang Dadi, also known as Ma Lingyao or Ma Lingguan, Marshall Ma, one of the four protectors of the Daoist Faith, also considered as a God of Fire and therefore particularly revered by potters.

The technique of decorating biscuit with colourful enamels, became popular in the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and was perfected by the potters of the Kangxi reign (1662-1722). It is remarkable that this figure is still preserved with its original throne-shaped pedestal. A figure almost identical to the present piece but without the throne, formerly in the collection of John D. Rockefeller Jr. and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, was sold at Christie's New York, 15th September 2016, lot 878. A figure of Shou Lao, the God of Longevity, seated on a throne related to the present piece, but overall of smaller size, formerly in the Widener Collection, is now in the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. (accession no. 1942.9.592), illustrated in the Museum's publication Decorative Arts, Part II. Far Eastern Ceramics and Paintings. Persian and Indian Tugs and Carpets, Washington D.C., 1998, p. 194.

Compare also a pair of famille-verte figures of comparable size to the present lot, both formerly also in the collection of John D. Rockefeller Jr. and now preserved in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: one, possibly the God of Wealth in his civil aspect (accession no. 61.200.11), measuring 60.6 cm in height, the other, the God of Wealth in his military aspect (57.8 cm), both seated on silver-gilt thrones, illustrated in Suzanne G. Valenstein, Oriental Ceramics, The World's Great Collections, vol. 11: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Tokyo, New York and San Francisco, 1982, col. pl. 26 and pl. 128.