View full screen - View 1 of Lot 13. An ebony longcase clock, John Miller, London, circa 1690.
13

An ebony longcase clock, John Miller, London, circa 1690

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

4,000 - 6,000 GBP

Property from an English Private Collection

An ebony longcase clock, John Miller, London, circa 1690

An ebony longcase clock, John Miller, London, circa 1690

Estimate:

4,000 - 6,000 GBP

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Property from an English Private Collection

An ebony longcase clock, John Miller, London, circa 1690


11-inch dial with unusual cherub and scroll spandrels linked by foliate engraving, signed along the lower edge John Miller Londini fecit, matted centre with date aperture, the movement with five latched, knopped and ringed pillars, anchor escapement, external locking plate striking on a bell, the associated case with flat top and moulded cornice above a replaced brass frieze fret and spiral hood pilasters to the rising hood, panelled trunk door with oval lenticle, panelled plinth with moulded base, the interior of the trunk door with a brass plaque engraved Ullyett Collection, 1029 and a Percy Webster label handwritten with details of John Miller

206cm 6ft 9in high

Dial and good original hands in good condition but rather dirty, silvering is rubbed. Movement is complete but extremely dirty and has surface rust to the steelwork, some replacements to the wheelwork, heavy bushing to the great wheels. Associated case is possibly slightly earlier than the movement and dial, hood re-converted to rising but never cut for a hood door, rear right spiral moulding is loose and part detached but we have it, gilt lenticle to trunk door loose, lowest section of backboard replaced due to rot, plinth substantially re-built, old scuffs, marks, cracks and repairs throughout. With pendulum, two weights, winder and case key


**Please be advised that bands made of materials derived from endangered or otherwise protected species (i.e. alligator and crocodile) are not sold with the watches and are for display purposes only. We reserve the right to remove these bands prior to shipping."


Please note that Condition 12 of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. All dimensions in catalogue descriptions are approximate. Condition reports may not specify mechanical replacements or imperfections to the movement, case, dial, pendulum, separate base(s) or dome. Watches in water-resistant cases have been opened to examine movements but no warranties are made that the watches are currently water-resistant. Please note that we do not guarantee the authenticity of any individual component parts, such as wheels, hands, crowns, crystals, screws, bracelets and leather bands, since subsequent repairs and restoration work may have resulted in the replacement of original parts. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. In particular, please note it is the purchaser's responsibility to comply with any applicable import and export matters, particularly in relation to lots incorporating materials from endangered species. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

The Ullyett Collection;
Sotheby's London, 22 October 1987, lot 231 (£5,352).
John Miller was apprenticed in 1667 to Samuel Knibb.  After Knibb's death in 1670 Miller was bound to Knibb's cousin Joseph until he was Free of the Clockmakers' Company in 1674. Clocks by John Miller are rare and the movement of the present clock show marked similarities to those of Joseph Knibb including the tall thin plates, finely turned latched pillars and cut-out in the backplate for the anchor escapement. John Miller died in London in 1702.