View full screen - View 1 of Lot 27. A George II carved mahogany side chair, circa 1740, in the manner of Giles Grendey.
27

A George II carved mahogany side chair, circa 1740, in the manner of Giles Grendey

Property from the Estate of Philip Astley-Jones

A George II carved mahogany side chair, circa 1740, in the manner of Giles Grendey

A George II carved mahogany side chair, circa 1740, in the manner of Giles Grendey

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Property from the Estate of Philip Astley-Jones

A George II carved mahogany side chair, circa 1740, in the manner of Giles Grendey


the lyre shaped back rest with imbricated and acanthus carved detail centred by a pierced and shell-carved splat, above a padded seat covered in close-nailed green cut-velvet, on foliate-clasped cabriole legs with hairy paw feet

A good model in overall reasonable restored condition and ready to place. Variation to colour and surface possibly re-polished. Small, secure splits to joints of top rail and uprights. Rails with red wash and later blocking to corners. Velvet upholstery generally in good order but would benefit from a gentle clean. One ear replaced and other fixed with later screws. Generally the frame with typical old marks, scuffs and scratches.


Please note that Condition 12 of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Formerly at Papplewick Hall, Nottinghamshire until sold Sotheby's Chester, Papplewick Hall, Papplewick, 29 September 1982, lot 406 and where acquired by the present owner.
Arthur Oswald, 'Papplewick Hall, Nottinghamshire - I, The home of Mr. and Mrs. Claude Chadburn', Country Life, 29 August 1963, p. 495, figs. 7 and 8.

These lyre-form side chairs, with pierced shell-form back splats, belong to a group of chairs traditionally attributed to the workshop of Giles Grendey, of Clerkenwell, London. A set of six walnut chairs which belonged to the Earls of Poulett at Hinton House, Somerset, being attributed to Grendey, have almost identical backs and splats and are stamped with journeymen’s initials ‘W.F.’ Two other walnut chairs attributed to Grendey with the same type of lyre-form back with pierced shell splat are part of the collection of furniture in the Lady Lever Art Gallery. Lucy Wood, in the Lady Lever Collection catalogue, describes at least fifteen other groups of chairs with similar backs and splats as the present pair and states that ‘In view of the enormous scale of Grendey’s workshop in Clerkenwell, and its documentary connection with at least three models that occur in very large numbers… it does seem likely that the great majority of 18th-century examples of these patterns are in fact the product of his [Grendey’s] manufactory.’


For a gilt and scarlet japanned example, see the pair sold Sotheby's London, A Connoisseur's Collection, 4 December 2013, lot 444. For a suite on mahogany seat furniture, including a settee and two pairs of side chairs with almost identical splats, see those sold Sotheby's London, 3 July 2012, lots 52, 53 and 54.


Papplewick Hall was commissioned in the 1780s by Frederick Montagu, a bachelor who retreated fully to its neoclassical serenity after retiring from his long political career in 1790. Its site was once the grange of Newstead Abbey, and had later belonged to the family who had served as physicians to both pre- and post-Civil War monarchs during the seventeenth century. The dominant aesthetic impression today is still the crisp neoclassicism of Montagu’s original commission, the work of an unnamed architect working in the elegant and precise style of the Adam brothers. Indeed, the design for the library in which the present lot was located, with its recessed bookcases surmounted by busts and flanked by pilasters, clearly draws on the Robert Adam design for the Old Library at Harewood House. Gambling debts brought the Montagu family to sell Papplewick Hall, and it was bought by Claude and Ethel Chadburn in 1919, who added a ground-floor billiard room extension. It is probable that the present lot was acquired by the Chadburns during their refurbishment of Papplewick Hall during the twentieth century, before it was sold at auction in 1982 and entered the collection of the present owner.