View full screen - View 1 of Lot 29. A Victorian silver posy holder, Thomas Smily, London 1865.
29

A Victorian silver posy holder, Thomas Smily, London 1865

A Victorian silver posy holder, Thomas Smily, London 1865

A Victorian silver posy holder, Thomas Smily, London 1865

A Victorian silver posy holder

Thomas Smily, London

1865


With acanthus leaf decoration, supporting itself on three leaf struts.

12cm.; 4¾in. long

Some light nibbles and a small missing piece around the rim and the top of the stem. Clear hallmarks.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Thomas Smily (1827-1918) was a younger brother of William Robert Smily (1818-1858), sons of William Smily (1793-1865) who was sometime manager of A.B. Savory & Sons’ silver factory. W.R. Smily entered his first mark in 1842. Following his death, his business, styled W.R. Smily, successor to Charles Lias (Grimwade, p. 582), was continued by his brother, Thomas, who entered his first mark in 1858. An advertisement for Smily’s of 1869 detailed ‘A large Stock of Tea and Coffee Services, Salvers, Cups, Tankards, Claret Jugs, Epergnes and Candelabra, Cake Baskets, Inkstands, Cruet Frames, Toast Racks, Salt Cellars, Children’s Cans, Spoons, Forks, and all other articles of Plate always on hand.’ (The Goldsmith, London, Monday, 1 March 1869, p. ii) In 1883 Thomas Smily transferred the business to Edwin Charles Purdie (1841-1920) before emigrating to Ontario, Canada, where he established himself as an estate agent.