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130

Tokujin Yoshioka

"Honey-Pop" Armchair

Property from a Private Collection, Miami

129

130

Tokujin Yoshioka

Tokujin Yoshioka

"Honey-Pop" Armchair

"Honey-Pop" Armchair

Authenticity guarantee

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Property from a Private Collection, Miami

Tokujin Yoshioka

"Honey-Pop" Armchair


designed 2001, executed 2004

number 113 from an edition of 300

produced by Tokujin Yoshioka Inc., Japan

glassine paper

signed tokujin Y, dated 30 JAN 2004 and numbered 113/300A

32 1/4 x 36 1/4 x 1/4 in. (81.9 x 92.1 x 0.6 cm) as illustrated

Overall in excellent condition. As pictured in the catalogue photography, the present “Honey Pop” is offered in its unfinished, flattened state and may be set into its completed, seated form by the buyer upon acquisition. The paper presents with light creasing and waviness throughout consistent with age as well as a few scattered minor tears to the edges, only visible upon close inspection and not impacting stability of the piece. The paper with some very light surface soiling concentrated to the recessed areas. For additional information on use, please contact the 20th Century Design department.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Luminaire, Miami

Acquired from the above by the present owner

Paola Antonelli, Objects of Design from The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2003, p. 280

Ryu Niimi, Tokujin Yoshioka Design, London, 2006, pp. 126-131

Gareth Williams, The Furniture Machine: Furniture since 1990, London, 2006, p. 106

Marcus Fairs, 21st Century Design: New Design Icons from Mass Market to Avant-Garde, London, 2009, pp. 160-161

Tokujin Yoshioka and Kazuo Hashiba, Tokujin Yoshioka, New York, 2010, pp. 25-35

Jim Postell, Furniture Design, Hoboken, NJ, 2012, p. 240

Charlotte and Peter Fiell, Chairs: 1,000 Masterpieces of Modern Design, 1800 to the Present Day, London, 2012, p. 670

Vitra Design Museum, Atlas of Furniture Design, Weil am Rhein, 2019, pp. 760-761

Tokujin Yoshioka’s iconic “Honey-Pop” Armchair explores the relationship between design and the human body. The chair is composed of 120 sheets of thin glassine paper traditionally used to make lanterns. Inspired by patterns found in nature, Yoshioka layered and glued the delicate material to create a strong honeycomb structure. The present lot represents the “Honey-Pop” in its initial flattened state. Fanned out like an accordion, the paper opens into a three-dimensional seat that, once sat upon, will compress and permanently take the impression of the sitter. Having never been sat upon, this lot presents a rare opportunity for collectors to not only acquire a renowned piece of contemporary design, examples of which are in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Museum of Modern Art and Philadelphia Museum of Art, but also to personally set the form.