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408

Virginie Elodie Demont-Breton

A Surprise

Virginie Elodie Demont-Breton

Virginie Elodie Demont-Breton

A Surprise

A Surprise

Virginie Elodie Demont-Breton

French

1859 - 1935

A Surprise


signed and dated Virginie Breton 1879 (lower right)

oil on canvas

canvas: 64¼ by 53 in.; 163.1 by 134.6 cm

framed: 72¼ 60¾ in.; 183.5 by 154.3 cm

The canvas is wax lined. The paint surface is in good condition, with some faint craquelure at center and bottom right, with two very tiny spots of paint loss at lower right. Under UV light, no apparent inpainting.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Sale: Sotheby's, New York, 24 February 1988, lot 217
Virginie Breton was an accomplished painter and ardent advocate for other women artists. She first trained as an artist with her father, Jules Breton, a celebrated painter of Barbizon landscapes and figures. She exhibited regularly at the Salon until 1934 and won numerous awards for her entries. Her choice of subject ranged from religious compositions, genre scenes and landscapes to depictions of family life and children, for which she had a particular penchant.

The goat here gnawing on a flowering branch recalls those painted by Virginie's friend and mentor, Rosa Bonheur, the celebrated painter of animals who, in 1865, was the first woman decorated with the Légion d'honneur. Virginie was the second to be inducted, in 1894, and became an Officier in 1914.