View full screen - View 1 of Lot 80. Papua New Guinea, Lake Sentani, late 19th/early 20th century | Eight Adze Ceremonial Blades (Obligation Stones).
80

Papua New Guinea, Lake Sentani, late 19th/early 20th century | Eight Adze Ceremonial Blades (Obligation Stones)

ReservesUK: Greenford Park WarehouseVAT applies to buyers outside the UK

Estimate:

2,500

to
- 4,000 GBP

Papua New Guinea, Lake Sentani, late 19th/early 20th century | Eight Adze Ceremonial Blades (Obligation Stones)

Papua New Guinea, Lake Sentani, late 19th/early 20th century | Eight Adze Ceremonial Blades (Obligation Stones)

Estimate:

2,500

to
- 4,000 GBP

Lot sold:

6,930

GBP

Papua New Guinea

Lake Sentani, late 19th/early 20th century

Eight Adze Ceremonial Blades (Obligation Stones)


carved and polished greenstone (Chloromelanite)

tallest height with stand: 28cm.; 11in.

An interesting and attractive group. Minor knicks to edges. Some surface scrathes. Pleasing variation to figure of hardstones.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

‘Please note that where the buyer is from within the UK the lot is sold with no VAT symbol. Where the buyer resides outside the UK the lot is invoiced as if it bore the “†” symbol.’
In Papua there was a highly organised system of ceremonial exchange within a certain specified area. Individuals or communities would give prized objects to a partner in the same or a different village. They would not immediately receive a gift in return but at a future date would receive something of at least equal value. The ceremonial giving or kula would take many months of preparation and was perceived as the centre of economic, social and ceremonial life; it not only provided prestige by the accumulation of prized objects but most importantly created a network of obligations which contributed to social stability: it also set up and reinforced trading routes.

A further form of exchange also existed whereby, if an item, such as one of the adze in the present lot, had a stable general value, then it could be used as currency. Those in positions of authority would store this 'currency' so that it could finally be distributed to the next generation, giving further honour and fame to the deceased and his descendants