View 1 of Lot 17. Ellen in the Woods.
View 1 of Lot 17. Ellen in the Woods.
17

Frank Weston Benson

Ellen in the Woods

Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 USD

Property from An Important American Collection

Frank Weston Benson

Frank Weston Benson

Ellen in the Woods

Ellen in the Woods

Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 USD

Current bid:

32,000

USD

(3 bids, reserve met)

Lot closes:

Lot closes:

3 days, 18 hours

3 days, 18 hours

March 3, 05:17 PM (GMT)

March 3, 05:17 PM (GMT)

Property from An Important American Collection

Frank Weston Benson

1862 - 1951

Ellen in the Woods


oil on canvas

canvas: 16 ⅛ by 12 inches (41 by 30.5 cm)

framed: 21 ½ by 17 ½ inches (54.6 by 44.5 cm)

Painted circa 1902.

The artist
Eleanor Perry Benson Lawson, circa 1920s (the artist's daughter, gift of the above)
Joan Lawson Andrews (by descent)
Faith Andrews Bedford, 1981 (gift of the above)
Acquired by the present owner from the above, circa 1990
Faith Andrews Bedford, Frank W. Benson: American Impressionist, New York, 1994, pp. 125-27, pl. 79, illustrated

Faith Andrews Bedford wrote about the present work, "A small study of Benson's wife, Ellie, sitting in a wooded glade at the edge of a meadow illustrates the elements he found so captivating. Ellen in the Woods is a rare work, for of the many sparkling, outdoor paintings Benson did at North Haven, his wife is featured in only two: this one and Evening Light (Cincinnati Museum of Art, Cincinnati, Ohio)." (Faith Andrews Bedford, Frank W. Benson: American Impressionist, New York, 1994, p. 126)


She continues, "Benson had begun this study hoping to use it as an aid in the completion of a larger work. But Ellie refused to pose again for a final canvas, and Benson did not feel he could do justice to the sitter and the dappled forest light by using the study as a model. The small painting was Benson's personal favorite; it hung in his studio for many years. In the late 1920s, when he began to teach his oldest child, Eleanor, to paint he gave her Ellen in the Woods as an example of plein-air painting. It encompasses all the broken prismatic light and sparkling color of his larger paintings on this period." (ibid, pp. 126-27)