View full screen - View 1 of Lot 325. A green-enamelled 'dragon' jar Mark and period of qianlong | 清乾隆 白地綠彩雲龍趕珠紋罐 《大清乾隆年製》款.
325

A green-enamelled 'dragon' jar Mark and period of qianlong | 清乾隆 白地綠彩雲龍趕珠紋罐 《大清乾隆年製》款

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Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 GBP

A green-enamelled 'dragon' jar Mark and period of qianlong | 清乾隆 白地綠彩雲龍趕珠紋罐 《大清乾隆年製》款

A green-enamelled 'dragon' jar Mark and period of qianlong | 清乾隆 白地綠彩雲龍趕珠紋罐 《大清乾隆年製》款

Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 GBP

Lot sold:

85,680

GBP

A green-enamelled 'dragon' jar

Mark and period of qianlong

清乾隆 白地綠彩雲龍趕珠紋罐 《大清乾隆年製》款


the globular tapering body rising to a rounded shoulder set with a short straight neck, decorated in green enamel with a pair of ferocious dragons, each chasing a 'flaming pearl' amongst scrolling clouds, all beneath a frieze of bajixiang, the recessed base inscribed in underglaze-blue with the six-character reign mark

Height 20.5 cm, 8⅛ in. 

The jar is in good condition apart from two very small nicks to the glaze to the

mouth rim.


Overall with light surface wear.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby’s is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Sotheby's London, 17th June 2000, Lot 165.

蘇富比倫敦,2000年6月17日,拍品165

This jar with its green-enamelled dragon motifs represents one of the archetypal examples of imperial porcelain. The pattern was first created during the Chenghua period (1465-1487) and remained popular throughout the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. While in the Ming period dragons were mostly incised and reserved in the biscuit before being enamelled in green, in the Qing dynasty they were outlined in blue under the glaze and covered with green washes over the transparent glaze. Various types of ‘green dragon’ wares were produced over the centuries, including jars, bowls and dishes.


Closely related vessels are held in public and private collections; see, for example, one in the Nanjing Museum, illustrated in The Official Kiln Porcelain of the Chinese Qing Dynasty, Shanghai, 2003, p. 271; and another in the Tianminlou Collection, illustrated in Chinese Porcelain. The S.C. Ko Tianminlou Collection, vol. 1, Hong Kong, 1987, pl. 114.