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22

James Edmund Harting | Archive of ornithological papers, correspondence, and other items, 19th-20th century

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

The Property of the Downside Abbey General Trust

James Edmund Harting | Archive of ornithological papers, correspondence, and other items, 19th-20th century

James Edmund Harting | Archive of ornithological papers, correspondence, and other items, 19th-20th century

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

The Property of the Downside Abbey General Trust

James Edmund Harting (1841-1928)


Archive, mostly relating to his work on ornithology:


Drawings and watercolours, chiefly of ornithological subjects, loose and in albums (together with prints, photographs, and other related illustrations)


Extensive working papers, including ‘Notes for a General History of Limicolae’ (2 volumes, 4to), with notes, cuttings, sketches, and a related notebook, 8vo; scrapbook with sketches and wildlife notes of his home in Surrey; a commonplace book; drafts, proofs (including of 'Ornithological Index to Wright's Vocabularies' and 'British Birds and their haunts'); a bundle of notes, correspondence and printed material relating to a commission on field voles including in Europe, 1890s; similar bundle on swan marks; papers relating to his work at the library of the Natural History Museum; notebooks and papers relating to his contributions to The Field and two small boxes of proofs; papers relating to publications, including contracts and a manuscript bibliography of Harting's works


Correspondence, including letters to Harting by Sir Joseph Hooker (4), Sir Christopher Sykes discussing the passage of the 1869 Sea Birds Preservation Act (4), Francis Henry Salvin (2), Edward Hearle Rodd (series, on birds of Cornwall, 1876-77), on ornithological, bibliographical, and other subjects; also a bundle of letters by Charles Noel, 3rd Earl of Gainsborough to Harting’s daughter Ethel (early 20th century), and letters of condolence on Harting’s death


Manuscript copy of C. Hawkins Fisher’s translation of The King’s Falconry (Louis XIII) by Charles D’Arcussia (3 volumes, 4to, 1893)


Printed material including pamphlets, magazine articles, offprints, cuttings, prospectuses, including printed articles by Harting arranged in 17 annual packets, 1882-1898


The collection housed in eight boxes with a hand-list of contents


THE ARCHIVE OF A GREAT VICTORIAN ORNITHOLOGIST. James Edward Harting (1841-1928) is best remembered as the author of the authoritative bibliography of falconry, Bibliotheca Accipitraria, but he was a prolific author on a range of natural historical subjects throughout his long life. He wrote contributions to the countryside magazine The Field over a period of fifty years and wrote for a wide range of other publications, as well as books on subjects ranging from The Birds of Shakespeare to British Animals Extinct within Historical Times. There are also papers here covering his work at the library of the Natural History Museum, his own buying and selling of books, his involvement in championing public environmental causes, and his intimate study of wildlife around his home in Surrey.

THE ARCHIVE OF A GREAT VICTORIAN ORNITHOLOGIST. James Edward Harting (1841-1928) is best remembered as the author of the authoritative bibliography of falconry, Bibliotheca Accipitraria, but he was a prolific author on a range of natural historical subjects throughout his long life. He wrote contributions to the countryside magazine The Field over a period of fifty years and wrote for a wide range of other publications, as well as books on subjects ranging from The Birds of Shakespeare to British Animals Extinct within Historical Times. There are also papers here covering his work at the library of the Natural History Museum, his own buying and selling of books, his involvement in championing public environmental causes, and his intimate study of wildlife around his home in Surrey.