View full screen - View 1 of Lot 251. A pair of unusual George III style ivory and blue painted gesso and gilt mirrors, in the manner of Thomas Chippendale.
251

A pair of unusual George III style ivory and blue painted gesso and gilt mirrors, in the manner of Thomas Chippendale

A pair of unusual George III style ivory and blue painted gesso and gilt mirrors, in the manner of Thomas Chippendale

A pair of unusual George III style ivory and blue painted gesso and gilt mirrors, in the manner of Thomas Chippendale

A pair of unusual George III style ivory and blue painted gesso and gilt mirrors

in the manner of Thomas Chippendale


the oval plates in moulded frames applied with running borders of beading, acanthus and guilloche

178cm. high, 56cm. wide

Very decorative. Paint would benefit from a clean or through being refreshed. Losses to decorative gesso borders - and chips to some raised details.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Inventory, 1885, p. 32, both in the morning room;
Inventory, 1926, p. 26, in the dining room;
Peter Thornton, The Furnishing of Mersham-le-Hatch, Part I, Apollo, April 1970, p. 271, fig.9.
The present mirrors follow Thomas Chippendale's design for 'A large oval glass in a rich carv'd frame painted blue & white' supplied on 14 October 1767 for the 'Anti-Room' at Mersham (Thornton, op. cit., p. 270, fig. 8) and presumably belong to the group of fine and historically sensitive copies executed in the 19th century.