View full screen - View 1 of Lot 143. A pair of 'Girl-in-a-Swing' porcelain and tole peint-mounted candlesticks, circa 1755, Charles Gouyn's factory, St. James's.
143

A pair of 'Girl-in-a-Swing' porcelain and tole peint-mounted candlesticks, circa 1755, Charles Gouyn's factory, St. James's

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

Property of Lord Ralph Kerr

A pair of 'Girl-in-a-Swing' porcelain and tole peint-mounted candlesticks, circa 1755, Charles Gouyn's factory, St. James's

A pair of 'Girl-in-a-Swing' porcelain and tole peint-mounted candlesticks, circa 1755, Charles Gouyn's factory, St. James's

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

Lot sold:

30,240

GBP

Property of Lord Ralph Kerr

A pair of 'Girl-in-a-Swing' porcelain and tole peint-mounted candlesticks

circa 1755, Charles Gouyn's factory, St. James's


each similarly modelled with a seated hound, both turned to the right, on mound base, supported by a painted metal rocaille base issuing a branch, applied with white porcelain flowerheads and painted metal leaves, each with a brass nozzle and drip pan

21.5cm. high, 23.9cm wide; 8 1/5 in., 9 1/8 in.

2

The right hand example, the hound is fixed in with a wire which is probably later, the hound itself is chipped to the end of its left ear and to the tip of its tail. The base has minor staining, probably from the time of firing. The metal stand appears in mostly original condition. The branch has a repair to the upper part and some losses to the leaves and to the paint on the leaves. The applied flowers which are English and perhaps Derby are generally in good apperance but inevitably have scattered chipping to the petals; three are not fixed to the branch. The other example: the hound is fixed in placed with a thin wire which is not original. The model itself is in good order and apperance but with some typical firing cracks and faults. It has a screw fixed to the underside at the end of which goes through the base but the nut to the underside is missing. The metal parts are in similar condition as the first example described. The porcelain flowers match the other example very well and agin have some scattered chipping and losses to the petals.
The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.
Anon, Inventory of Furniture and Effects at Melbourne Hall, [ref.168-13-3 Melbourne Archive] 25 March 1858, p.1. in the Drawing Room, 'Two bronze candlesticks with Figures of Dogs'.

Anon, Inventory of Fixtures, Furniture, Books, Pictures, Tools, etc., [ref.168-9 Melbourne Archive] 12 July 1897, probably, '2 white metal and China candelbra [sic]'.

Porcelain figures of this distinctive and naive modeling were traditionally cataloged under the collective term 'Girl-in-a-Swing', named so after the well-known figure gifted by Lt.-Col. K. Dingwall to the Victoria and Albert museum, London (mus. no. C.587-1922). Porcelain scholars had long suspected the group was linked to the French Huguenot Charles Gouyn, and this was finally confirmed in the paper by Bernard Dragesco 'English Ceramics in French Archives - The Writings of Jean Helliot, the Adventures of Jacques Louis Brolliet and the Identification of the 'Girl-in-a-Swing' factory', London, June 1993.


Gouyn was born in Dieppe, France, and by 1736 was established in London as a jeweler in Bennet Street, St. James. He was briefly involved with Nicholas Sprimont's porcelain factory at Chelsea, though he parted ways in about 1747/48 to begin his rival enterprise in St. James, where porcelain production seems likely to have lasted until about 1760.