Old Master Sculpture & Works of Art

Old Master Sculpture & Works of Art

View full screen - View 1 of Lot 40. Attributed to Andrea Briosco, called Riccio (circa 1470-1532) and workshop | Italian, Padua, first third 16th century | Bust of a Young Man.

Attributed to Andrea Briosco, called Riccio (circa 1470-1532) and workshop | Italian, Padua, first third 16th century | Bust of a Young Man

This lot has been withdrawn

Lot Details

Description

Attributed to Andrea Briosco, called Riccio (circa 1470-1532) and workshop

Italian, Padua, first third 16th century

Bust of a Young Man


bronze

with a label inscribed: C.I.N.O.A INTERNATIONAL ART TREASURES EXHIBITION VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM 1962 EXHIBIT No. 614

7cm., 2¾in.

This lot has been withdrawn from the sale.

Luigi Grassi (1858-1937), Florence, by 1927;

with G. Schubert, Milan, 1962;

Prof. Michael Jaffe, CBE (1923-1997), Cambridge;

thence by descent;

on loan to the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, 1999-2013;

Christie's London, 5 July 2013, lot 51;

private collection, Europe

L. Planiscig, Andrea Riccio, Vienna, 1927, p. 222
International Art Treasures Exhibition, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1962, no. 614

The affinity of this diminutive bust with the work of Andrea Riccio was recognised by Leo Planiscig, who published it in his seminal 1927 monograph on the Paduan bronze sculptor (op. cit.). Depicting a young man wearing a wreath, it may represent the god Bacchus or one of his followers. Its distinctive facial type finds numerous comparisons in Riccio's autograph oeuvre, perhaps most strikingly in the Shepherd with Syrinx in the Louvre (inv. no. OA 6311), which has a near-identical expression, with a furrowed brow (see op. cit., no. 21). At a height of 4.5cm., Riccio's self-portrait bust in the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (inv. no. KK 5516) provides a conceptual parallel for this unusually small bronze. Its flat truncation, upwards gaze and all'antica sentiment place it within the context of a series of slightly larger bronze busts associated with Antonio Lombardo and Severo da Ravenna, which were probably intended for display in a scholar's studiolo.

RELATED LITERATURE

D. Allen and P. Motture, Andrea Riccio: Renaissance Master of Bronze, exh. cat. The Frick Collection, New York, 2008