View full screen - View 1 of Lot 67. Albert Xavery (1664-1728) | Netherlandish, The Hague, dated 1706 | Actaeon and Endymion.
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Albert Xavery (1664-1728) | Netherlandish, The Hague, dated 1706 | Actaeon and Endymion

Property from an English Private Collection

Albert Xavery (1664-1728) | Netherlandish, The Hague, dated 1706 | Actaeon and Endymion

Albert Xavery (1664-1728) | Netherlandish, The Hague, dated 1706 | Actaeon and Endymion

Property from an English Private Collection

Albert Xavery (1664-1728)

Netherlandish, The Hague, dated 1706

Actaeon and Endymion


Endymion signed: ALBERTVS XAVERY; and Actaeon inscribed and dated: INV ET FECIT 1706

partially gilt marble, with a white wash

115cm., 45 1/4 in. each

(Endymion: 148cm., 58 1/4 in. including wood spear)

The figures are weathered due to their placement outside. As a result there are losses and flaking to the white paint and gilding, and a coarse, porous surface with minor nicks throughout. There is lichen present on the surfaces of both figures. The proper right hand of Actaeon is reattached and possibly a replacement. The wood spear is later. Otherwise the condition is good.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE


Condition 11 of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot.

Please note that this lot will be sent to our Greenford Park warehouse following the sale.
Gustav Leonhardt, Amsterdam;
his sale, Sotheby's London, 29 April 2014, lot 602, where acquired by the present owner
P. M. Fischer, Ignatius en Jan van Logteren. Beeldhouwers en Stuckunstenaars in het Amsterdam van de 18de eeuw, Utrecht, 2005, p. 45 (Actaeon)
The three sculptures from the garden of Huis Bartolotti presented in this sale are by the hand of the Antwerp sculptor Albert Xavery and were published in P. M. Fisher's survey of 18th century sculpture from Amsterdam (op. cit.). The elegant mythological figures, which are united by their association with hunting, are quintessential examples of Netherlandish garden statuary from the 18th century.

Along with Alexander van Papenhoven and Jan Claudius de Cock, Albert Xavery was among a group of Flemish sculptors that forged an international career from Antwerp but decided to settle in Holland to supply its wealthy nobility and bourgeoisie with statuary.  Around 1690, Xavery based himself in The Hague and soon attracted commissions from the Royal family. He carved the statue of The Rape of the Sabine Women after Giambologna in the garden of Paleis Het Loo and personfications of Europa and Africa at Slot Zeist.

Statuary became a must-have feature of Netherlandish gardens following the French architect and furniture desginer Daniel Marot's transformation of Paleis Het Loo from 1684. The gardens of both town- and country houses were redesigned with the symmetrical sway of Louis XIV's parks and marble, stone or lead mythological characters and personifications were installed along their focal points and often arranged in a narrative sequence. These statues therefore provided delightful surprises and pleasant conversation points whilst strolling through the gardens. The ties within the present ensemble show how inspiring such gardens may have been: the goddess of the hunt Diana with Actaeon, the hunter who she turned into a stag, and Endymion, the hunter who she fell in love with as he slept.

RELATED LITERATURE
P. M. Fischer, Ignatius en Jan van Logteren. Beeldhouwers en Stuckunstenaars in het Amsterdam van de 18de eeuw, Utrecht, 2005, pp. 13-14, 27, 45, 119, 303 and 512; H. Morales, Classical Mythology. A Very Short Introduction, Oxford, 2007, p. 44.