View full screen - View 1 of Lot 8. A rare yellow jade 'lingzhi' ruyi sceptre Qing dynasty, 18th century | 清十八世紀 黃玉靈芝如意.
8

A rare yellow jade 'lingzhi' ruyi sceptre Qing dynasty, 18th century | 清十八世紀 黃玉靈芝如意

Estimate:

500,000 to - 700,000 HKD

Property from an Old Hong Kong Family Collection 香港家族舊藏

A rare yellow jade 'lingzhi' ruyi sceptre Qing dynasty, 18th century | 清十八世紀 黃玉靈芝如意

A rare yellow jade 'lingzhi' ruyi sceptre Qing dynasty, 18th century | 清十八世紀 黃玉靈芝如意

Estimate:

500,000 to - 700,000 HKD

Lot sold:

3,024,000

HKD

Property from an Old Hong Kong Family Collection

A rare yellow jade 'lingzhi' ruyi sceptre

Qing dynasty, 18th century

香港家族舊藏

清十八世紀 黃玉靈芝如意


with the head depicted as three lingzhi blooms, the largest one rendered borne on a gently gnarled branch forming the shaft and issuing further lingzhi blooms, the warm yellow stone with russet patches, original wood stand

31.6 cm

The ruyi sceptre is in good overall condition with just expected insignificant bruises and nibbles to the extremities.


整體品相良好,惟邊沿見輕細磕痕,屬正常。


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Sotheby's Hong Kong, 19th November 1985, lot 93.

Christie's Hong Kong, 2nd October 1991, lot 1459.


香港蘇富比1985年11月19日,編號93

香港佳士得1991年10月2日,編號1459

This sceptre is distinguished for the highly valued yellow stone from which it has been fashioned. Owing to the rarity of yellow jade, its brownish skin was often worked into a piece, as seen on the present lot, to use to the best advantage of this precious material.


Compare a similar, green example, preserved in the Palace Museum, Beijing (accession no. Gu 88937), illustrated in Gugong Bowuyuan cangpin daxi: yuqi bian, vol. 8: Qing / Compendium of Collections in the Palace Museum: Jade, vol. 8: Qing Dynasty, Beijing, 2011, pl. 73; a larger, white jade sceptre in the National Palace Museum, Taipei (accession no. Zhong yu 000629 [http://antiquities.npm.gov.tw/Utensils_Page.aspx?ItemId=1215]), included in the Museum’s exhibition Auspicious Ju-I Scepters of China, Taipei, 1995, cat. no. 26; and a yellow ruyi in the form of a lingzhi branch, but carved with archaistic dragons on the head and stem, sold in these rooms, 17th May 1977, lot 312.