View full screen - View 1 of Lot 28. A rare limestone fragmentary relief of a lion head Northern Qi dynasty | 北齊 石灰岩浮雕獅頭殘石     .
28

A rare limestone fragmentary relief of a lion head Northern Qi dynasty | 北齊 石灰岩浮雕獅頭殘石

A rare limestone fragmentary relief of a lion head Northern Qi dynasty | 北齊 石灰岩浮雕獅頭殘石

A rare limestone fragmentary relief of a lion head Northern Qi dynasty | 北齊 石灰岩浮雕獅頭殘石

A rare limestone fragmentary relief of a lion head

Northern Qi dynasty

北齊 石灰岩浮雕獅頭殘石


the greyish stone with traces of a white layer and ochre pigment, naturalistically carved in the form of a lion head, set with bulging expressive eyes within thin brows, a broad snout with flared nostrils, above a wide grinning mouth closed with a cleft upper lip, all below raised pricked ears, stepped wood stand

22.5 cm

The rear of the head and the neck is truncated as visible in the photo. The ears are rebuilt. There are also traces of retouching, especially to its right side.


自頭後方及頸部截斷,如圖所見。雙耳重塑。有潤飾痕跡,尤見右側。


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Collection of Sakamoto Gorō (1923-2016), acquired between the 1950s and 1960s.

Sotheby's Hong Kong, 8th October 2013, lot 119.


坂本五郎(1923-2016年)收藏,購於1950-1960年代

香港蘇富比2013年10月8日,編號119

Two comparable lion heads which may have served as supports for the pillars of a gateway, with only the heads and front parts of the animals fully executed and the hind parts serving as plinths, are illustrated in Osvald Sirén, Chinese Sculpture from the Fifth to the Fourteenth Century, vol. 1, New York, 1970, pls 434 a and b, the former from the collection of Octave Homberg, Paris, and the latter from a New York private collection.