View full screen - View 1 of Lot 59. 1960 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible.
59

Volkswagen

1960 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible

No reserve

Reserves

Estimate:

60,000 - 70,000 USD

Volkswagen

Volkswagen

1960 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible

1960 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible

No reserve

Estimate:

60,000 - 70,000 USD

Lot sold:

50,400

USD

1960 Volkswagen Beetle Cabriolet 

Coachwork by Karmann

 

Chassis no. 2881838

Engine no. 3604797    


·        Two Southern California owners from new

·        Comprehensive restoration in 2001

·        A well-accessorized example

·        Featured in VW Trends magazine in March 2001

To request a condition report, please contact Thatcher Keast, Consignment Department Manager, RM Sotheby’s, at TKeast@rmsothebys.com.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Please note that the correct estimate for this lot is $50,000 - $70,000. Please note that this lot is only subject to RM Sotheby’s Buyer’s Premium which is 12% of the Hammer Price for a Hammer Price up to and including $250,00 and 10% of any amount of the Hammer Price in excess of $250,000, along with the RM Conditions of Business which can be found through the online catalogue. For the avoidance of doubt, any invoicing or post-sale inquiries for this lot will be handled by RM Sotheby’s.

If any postwar automobile can be classified as “charming”, it would have to be the delightful VW Beetle convertible, or “Karmann Kabriolett”, as badged by its coachbuilder, Wilhelm Karmann GmbH of Osnabrück. While mass production of the basic air-cooled Type 1 Volkswagen began in 1947 and lasted an astonishing 56 years, the first Karmann drop-top Beetle did not appear until 1953. Karmann built 5,841 of these convertibles for US delivery during the 1960 model year, a small fraction of the nearly 160,000 Beetles delivered that year to American buyers.

 

These little convertibles were extremely popular in sunny climates such as Southern California. This lovely example was sold new—with a base price of $2,055—to its first owner, a resident of Hermosa Beach, California, who kept it until 1989. Its second owner, also residing in Hermosa Beach, presented it as a wedding gift to his new wife. Finished in pale Yukon Yellow (Paint code L10009), it was upholstered in an attractive combination of Bamboo Green and white leatherette with black rubber floor mats. It has a tan top and tonneau cover. 

 

Its two owners lavished a great deal of care on this little convertible. They equipped this 1.2-liter, 36-horsepower Beetle with numerous factory and aftermarket accessories including a Bendix Sapphire I AM-band pushbutton radio, a pair of outside mirrors, a Dehne dashboard fuel tank gauge, a wood and plastic mesh shelf (called a “Kleingepacktrager”) mounted beneath the dashboard to carry small items, and an analog clock in the center of the steering wheel hub.

 

At some point, this little ragtop was fitted with an American-built Judson supercharger, which increased power by some 12 percent. In that configuration it was tested by VW Trends magazine for its March 2001 issue and compared to an earlier Beetle equipped with an Okrasa performance kit. While the supercharger was later removed and does not accompany the car, the rarely seen Judson badging remains on the convertible’s glovebox door.

 

This handsome Karmann Cabriolet was restored in 2001. It is supplied with an original owner’s manual, a copy of the VW Trends magazine issue in which it was featured, and a desirable Hazet Tourist accessory tool kit that nests in the center of the spare wheel.