View full screen - View 1 of Lot 6. A cloisonné enamel vase | With signature on a silver tablet Kyoto Namikawa (workshop of Namikawa Yasuyuki, 1845-1927) | Meiji period, late 19th century.
6

A cloisonné enamel vase | With signature on a silver tablet Kyoto Namikawa (workshop of Namikawa Yasuyuki, 1845-1927) | Meiji period, late 19th century

Property from the John and Muriel Okladek Collection

A cloisonné enamel vase | With signature on a silver tablet Kyoto Namikawa (workshop of Namikawa Yasuyuki, 1845-1927) | Meiji period, late 19th century

A cloisonné enamel vase | With signature on a silver tablet Kyoto Namikawa (workshop of Namikawa Yasuyuki, 1845-1927) | Meiji period, late 19th century

Property from the John and Muriel Okladek Collection

A cloisonné enamel vase

With signature on a silver tablet Kyoto Namikawa (workshop of Namikawa Yasuyuki, 1845-1927)

Meiji period, late 19th century


the tapering vase with rounded shoulder, short neck, and wide neck rim, copper mounts, decorated in coloured cloisonné enamels on a black ground interspersed with panels worked in gold and silver wire, with butterflies among chrysanthemums, wisteria, iris, plum blossoms and peony sprays, the shoulder with stylised cloud scrolls and cherry blossom, signed on a silver tablet Kyoto Namikawa (workshop of Namikawa Yasuyuki, 1845-1927)

21.5 cm., 8½ in. high

The vase in good condition.


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The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

The Ahrens Company was one of many companies set up under the new Meiji government’s programme whereby western specialists were invited to Japan to help modernise the country’s existing industries. Their chief technologist was the German chemist Gottfried Wagener (1831–92). Wagener, an expert on glazes and firing techniques, is renowned for having introduced modern European enamelling technology to Japan.


In 1878 Wagener moved to Kyoto where he met the former samurai turned cloisonné artist Namikawa Yasuyuki (1845-1927). Yasuyuki began his career around 1868 and worked with the Kyoto Shippō Kaisha from 1871 to 1874. Although it is not clear how Wagener and Yasuyuki met, there is no doubt that they collaborated and that the most significant result of their collaboration was the creation of the superb semi-transparent mirror-black enamel that was to become the hallmark of much of Yasuyuki’s subsequent work.


Yasuyuki’s cloisonné enamels are characterised by the skilful use of intricate wirework and superb attention to detail. The designs on his earlier pieces are relatively traditional, consisting mainly of stylised botanical and formal geometric motifs. The designs on much of his later work tends to be more pictorial, consisting mainly of scenes from nature and views of landmarks in and around Kyoto. His work included both pieces with designs predominantly defined by wires and pieces where the pictorial composition is balanced by large areas of pure coloured enamel.