View full screen - View 1 of Lot 641. View of a brook in the countryside, a castle in the hillside above, with Pâris and Oenone in the foreground.
641

Jean-Victor Bertin

View of a brook in the countryside, a castle in the hillside above, with Pâris and Oenone in the foreground

Estimate:

8,000 to - 12,000 USD

Jean-Victor Bertin

Jean-Victor Bertin

View of a brook in the countryside, a castle in the hillside above, with Pâris and Oenone in the foreground

View of a brook in the countryside, a castle in the hillside above, with Pâris and Oenone in the foreground

Estimate:

8,000 to - 12,000 USD

Lot sold:

50,400

USD

Jean-Victor Bertin

Paris 1767 - 1842

View of a brook in the countryside, a castle in the hillside above, with Pâris and Oenone in the foreground 


oil on panel

panel: 12 5/8 in. by 10 1/4 in.; 32 by 26 cm.

framed: 19 1/8 by 16 1/4 in.; 148.5 by 41.3 cm.

The panel is stable and uncradled. The paint layer has been preserved very well, with a nice patina and even, glossy varnish. Details in the composition, such as the foliage on the tree and the light hitting the waves in the foreground remain; the colors are vibrant. Under ultraviolet light there is minimal retouching of note, only some areas in the very top of the panel likely addressing some old frame abrasion. Overall this is in excellent condition and is offered in a carved giltwood frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Initially trained under the history painter Gabriel-François Doyen, by 1788 Bertin had become a pupil of Valenciennes, who encouraged him to paint idealized Italianate landscapes in the tradition of Poussin. He travelled to Italy from 1806 to 1808, working on his style and developing great interest in topographical details as well as atmospheric effects. 


This charming painting likely dates between 1794 and 1800, before the artist travels to Italy himself. The subject of Paris and Oenone is taken from Ovid's Heriodes, chapter 5, and depicts a scene from the courtship of the son of King Priam of Troy and the daughter of the river god Cebren. Paris is best known to a modern audience for abducting Helen of Sparta, thus bringing about the Trojan War and the destruction of his father’s kingdom. However, it was just to avoid that catastrophic chain of events, which had been prophesized at his birth, that the infant Paris was exposed and left to die on Mount Ida. He was rescued by a passing shepherd who raised him as his own, and it was while guarding the flocks that Paris met the mountain nymph Oenone. Here Bertin shows Paris carving Oenone's name into a tree. They would marry and have a son, Corythus, but Paris eventually abandons Oenone to return to Troy.


This painting will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist's work which is being compiled by Damien Dumarquez and Jean-Louis Litron. We are grateful for their assistance with the cataloguing of this lot and for confirming the attribution based on photographs.