View full screen - View 1 of Lot 531. Falconers on a path with harvesters loading hay onto a wagon nearby, a valley beyond, at dusk.
531

Johannes Lingelbach

Falconers on a path with harvesters loading hay onto a wagon nearby, a valley beyond, at dusk

Estimate:

70,000

to
- 90,000 USD

Johannes Lingelbach

Johannes Lingelbach

Falconers on a path with harvesters loading hay onto a wagon nearby, a valley beyond, at dusk

Falconers on a path with harvesters loading hay onto a wagon nearby, a valley beyond, at dusk

Estimate:

70,000

to
- 90,000 USD

Johannes Lingelbach

Frankfurt am Main 1622 - 1674 Amsterdam

Falconers on a path with harvesters loading hay onto a wagon nearby, a valley beyond, at dusk


signed and dated lower center: Jlingelbach/1659

oil on canvas

canvas: 20 1/3 by 17 1/4 in.; 51.5 by 43.6 cm. 

framed: 26 3/4 by 23 3/4 in.; 67.9 by 60.3 cm. 

This painting is full restored and ready to hang as is. The painting has a glue relining. Under UV: a few minor touches in the sky and at the bottom edge. This painting is in lovely state with good coloration and excellent detail throughout. In a modern black ebonized wood molding frame, in Dutch 17th Century style.

The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Possibly H. ten Kate Sale, Van de Schley, Amsterdam, 10 June 1801, lot 97 (fl. 95 to Pruyssenaar);
With D. Katz, Dieren, circa 1955;
E. Ongering, Bilthoven, 1958;
Anonymous sale, Amsterdam, Christie’s, 11 May 1994, lot 169 (sold for 247.250 guilders);
With Richard Green, London;
From whom acquired by a private collector, England;
From whom acquired by the present owner. 

Although Johannes Lingelbach was born in Germany, his family moved to Amsterdam by the time he was twelve years old, and he probably received his artistic training there. He may have visited France, and he was certainly in Rome from 1647 to 1650. However, the artist spent the rest of his life in Amsterdam after 1653. While Pieter van Laer’s (circa 1592–1642) influence was paramount on Lingelbach during his years in Italy, the Haarlem painter Philips Wouwermans (1619–1668) seems to have inspired him most after his return to Holland in the early 1650s. After Lingelbach’s return he was increasingly influenced by the latter's landscapes with figures at work and horses, themes exemplified in the present painting. In many contemporary accounts, Lingelbach is mentioned as a pupil of Wouwermans. This presumption is based on Lingelbach’s paintings from the late 1650s and 1660s.1 However, it is also possible that Lingelbach absorbed this influence through Wouwerman’s fellow-townsmen Jan Wijnants (circa 1630–1684), who moved from Haarlem to Amsterdam in 1659. From 1660 on, Lingelbach contributed staffage to Wijnants’ paintings.2The present harvesting scene, executed in 1659, is a work of the artist’s maturity and has strong affinities Wouwermans classic horse landscapes. The scene takes place at dusk, the last few rays of sun gilding the grasses in the foreground and gleaming on the white horse’s flanks. A hay cart, drawn by two horses, has halted by a stream, while one peasant hands over hay with a pitchfork to another standing atop the pile of hay in the cart. To the right, a peasant family sit and eat by the stream, while to the left a falconer and a rider returning from the hunt make their way along the stream towards the viewer. The falconer is carrying a hoop of hooded falcons and is followed by four greyhounds. Immediately behind the grassy outcrop of the foreground of the painting stretches a hazy, distant valley, the figures forming a repoussoir against the valley and the sky. A very similar composition by Wouwerman with the same subject, and an absence of a middle ground and a high horizon, can be seen in Peasants in the Field: Hay Harvest in the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London. 


There are several repetitions of the subject in important museum collections. One variation on the theme, and similar in size though horizontal in format, is Lingelbach’s Landscape with Farmers at Rest in the collection of The Mauritshuis in The Hague. A horizontal example by the artist and dated 1664 is in the National Gallery, London. The third comparable example to the present painting, The Grass Crop is in the collection of the Staatliches Museum in Schwerin.


1. C. Burger-Wegener, Johannes Lingelbach, Berlin 1976, pp. 124, 193, note 282, refers to Scheltema 1853; Wurzbach 1910; Zülch 1935; HdG II, S.658.

2. Burger-Wegener 1976, p. 126.