View full screen - View 1 of Lot 583. David meeting Abigail .
583

Giovanni Gioseffo dal Sole

David meeting Abigail

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 50,000 USD

Giovanni Gioseffo dal Sole

Giovanni Gioseffo dal Sole

David meeting Abigail

David meeting Abigail

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 50,000 USD

Giovanni Gioseffo dal Sole

Bologna 1654 - 1719

David meeting Abigail


oil on canvas, unlined

canvas: 72 7/8 by 80 3/4 in.; 185 by 205 cm.

framed: 78 3/4 by 86 in.; 200 by 218.4 cm.

The canvas is unlined and stable on it stretcher. Frame abrasion and later (now discolored) retouching as well as some buckling is present at all four corners but is not distracting. The impressive composition reads relatively well under dirty varnish. A few scratches and areas of abrasion and thinning are visible to the naked eye but are not distracting, such as around Abigail's skirt and at lower left. Under UV inspection, the aforementioned areas of repair are visible, as well as a few larger areas of retouching in the background at lower left, upper left, and upper right, but the faces and figures are largely free from retouching. As this canvas is unlined and has had little restoration work, we recommend contacting an outside restorer for advice on a cleaning and treatment plan. Offered in a simply carved giltwood frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Collection of Dr. Pedro Martino (1876 - 1929), Uruguay (according to a label on the reverse dated 30 June 1933), and by inheritance to his widow;
Art market, Montevideo, Uruguay;
Where acquired.

M. Danieli, "Tre dipinti per il principe Eugenio di Savoia acquistati a Bologna," in: Patrons, Intermediaries and Venetian Artists in Vienna and Imperial Domains (1650–1750), ed. E. Lucchese and M. Klemenčič, Ljubljana 2021, forthcoming (as Giuseppe Carlo Pedretti).

This impressive, unlined, and previously unknown canvas depicts the Meeting of David and Abigail as told in the Book of Samuel. While exiled in the wilderness of Judah, David asked the wealthy farmer Nabal, Abigail’s wife, for provisions, and Nabal refused, leading David to send his army to retaliate. Abigail took matters into her own hands and brought provisions on horseback to intercept David and pleaded with him for mercy. After the meeting, Nabal died and David interpreted it as a sign from God; he asked Abigail to marry him and she became his second wife.


As the present lot derives influence from Bolognese, Emilian, and Venetian sources, it is most probably the work of Giovanni Gioseffo dal Sole, who worked primarily in Bologna but by the 1680s had a strong Venetian influence from his teacher Lorenzo Passinelli as well as from his time in Verona in the employ of Count Giusti. Dal Sole participated in the decoration of the Aeneid Gallery of the Palazzo Buonaccorsi in Macerata alongside the leading artists of his generation, contributing a canvas depicting Andromache weeping before Aeneas.


An alternative attribution to Giuseppe Carlo Pedretti has been proposed by Marco Tanzi and Michele Danieli.