View full screen - View 1 of Lot 104. A magnificent large sancai-glazed figure of a caparisoned Fereghan horse, Tang dynasty | 唐 三彩馬.
104

A magnificent large sancai-glazed figure of a caparisoned Fereghan horse, Tang dynasty | 唐 三彩馬

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

300,000 - 400,000 GBP

Property from an English Private Collection

A magnificent large sancai-glazed figure of a caparisoned Fereghan horse, Tang dynasty | 唐 三彩馬

A magnificent large sancai-glazed figure of a caparisoned Fereghan horse, Tang dynasty | 唐 三彩馬

Estimate:

300,000 - 400,000 GBP

Lot sold:

352,800

GBP

Property from an English Private Collection

A magnificent large sancai-glazed figure of a caparisoned Fereghan horse

Tang dynasty

唐 三彩馬



superbly modelled, standing four square on a rectangular plinth, the harnessed head turned slightly to the left with ears picked, the long mane parted at the forelock and falling to one side, covered in a straw-coloured glaze, the dark green saddlecloth roughened to simulate fur, the muscular body glazed predominantly in rich chestnut suffused with straw-coloured streaks

Height 68 cm, 26¾ in.

There is restoration to the upper and lower section of each leg, over-painting to cracks running diagonally down from the top front edge of the saddle to the rear haunches on one side and a horizontal line running across the saddle blanket to the rear haunches on the other side, some over-painting to the front edges of the saddle blanket on both sides, over-painting to both forelocks and to a crack through the right ear, a new section of tail, over-painting and a crack encircling the lower neck, loss to an area of the glaze between the rear legs, and several firing cracks to the saddle and saddle blanket and nibbles to the edges of the saddle blanket.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby’s is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


我們很高興為您提供上述拍品狀況報告。由於敝公司非專業修復人員,在此敦促您向其他專業修復人員索取諮詢,以獲得更詳盡、專業之報告。

準買家應該檢查每款拍品以確認其狀況,蘇富比所作的任何陳述均為專業主觀看法而非事實陳述。準買家應參考有關該拍賣的重要通知(見圖錄)。

雖然本狀況報告或有針對某拍品之討論,但所有拍賣品均根據印於圖錄內之業務規則以拍賣時狀況出售。

Sotheby's London, 16th June 1998, lot 213.

倫敦蘇富比1998年6月16日,編號213

This magnificent horse is exceptionally modelled and glazed, the powerful body well-defined of rounded and muscular form, the fine sancai (three-colour) glazes dramatically running down its well-built body. The potter who sculpted and glazed this piece has aptly brought to life the horse's strong physicality and spirited nature, showcasing the superior craftsmanship achieved during the Tang dynasty (618-907). As a symbol of status and wealth, ownership of horses in life as in death reflected the high rank and importance of their owners at the time, when strict sumptuary laws declared the right to own horses as an aristocratic privilege. Horses of the most prestigious breed, known as ‘blood-sweating horses’, which is represented in the present piece, were sent to China as tribute from the Ferghana Valley in Central Asia during the Tang court’s vigorous expansion to the west. This magnificent horse figure is covered overall with the renowned sancai glazes, coloured with copper and iron to create a lively spectrum of greens and ambers over a white-slipped ground. It is exemplary of sculptures created for important tombs during the Tang period.


Compare a few closely related sancai horses glazed in similar colours and with a long mane, furry saddle cloth and elaborate trappings as the present piece; one with straight forelock excavated in 1963 at Guanlin Tomb no. 2, Luoyang, illustrated in Luoyang Tang Sancai / The Sancai Wares of the Tang Dynasty in Luoyang, Beijing, 1980, pl. 72; one with a knotted tail and of slightly taller size, excavated in Luoyang, Henan province and now in the National Museum of History, Taipei (accession no. h30), included in the Museum’s exhibition The Special Exhibition of Tang Tri-colour, Taipei, 1995, illustrated on the cover of Liu Liang-yu, A Survey of Chinese Ceramics, vol. 1: Early Wares: Prehistoric to Tenth Century, Taipei, 1991; another one with feet and tail glazed in different colours and again straight forelock, in the Collection of Mr and Mrs Ezekiel Schloss, illustrated in Ezekiel Schloss, Ancient Chinese Ceramic Sculpture: from Han through T’ang, vol. 2, Stamford, 1977, pl. V; and a slightly taller piece, with a large cream splash on the left shoulder as the present horse, but with a narrower neck and open mouth, from the Jingguantang Collection in the Tsui Museum of Art, illustrated in The Tsui Museum of Art. Chinese Ceramics I. Neolithic to Liao, Hong Kong, 1993, pl. 90, sold in these rooms, 10th June 1986, lot 15, and at Christie’s New York, 20th March 1997, lot 53, and again 16th March 2015, lot 3225.


The dating of this lot is consistent with Oxford Authentication Thermoluminescence Analysis Report no.C198k8.