View full screen - View 1 of Lot 128. A black-glazed 'ribbed' 'tulu' vase, Northern Song / Jin dynasty | 北宋 / 金 黑釉棱線紋小口瓶.
128

A black-glazed 'ribbed' 'tulu' vase, Northern Song / Jin dynasty | 北宋 / 金 黑釉棱線紋小口瓶

Import Tariff

Estimate:

200,000

to
- 300,000 USD

Property of a Private Collector

A black-glazed 'ribbed' 'tulu' vase, Northern Song / Jin dynasty | 北宋 / 金 黑釉棱線紋小口瓶

A black-glazed 'ribbed' 'tulu' vase, Northern Song / Jin dynasty | 北宋 / 金 黑釉棱線紋小口瓶

Estimate:

200,000

to
- 300,000 USD

A black-glazed 'ribbed' 'tulu' vase

Northern Song / Jin dynasty

北宋 / 金 黑釉棱線紋小口瓶


the domed body rising to a narrow waisted neck and lipped rim, applied to a narrow and waisted neck to a lipped rim, the body applied with a row of white vertical ribs, covered overall with a lustrous black glaze stopping neatly at the foot, the countersunk base unglazed revealing the grayish stoneware body


Height 8 ⅝ in., 22 cm

The exterior body over-sprayed, presumably concealing restoration, stopping at the mouth rim, with possible repair to the neck.


器身外壁經噴釉(頸部以下),有可能是為了掩蓋修復,且頸部可能經修補。


Because this lot was imported into the United States after September 1, 2020, it is subject to an import tariff of 7.5% of the value declared upon entry into the United States. $18,750, plus applicable sales tax will be included on your invoice unless you instruct Sotheby's to arrange shipping of the lot to a foreign address. For more information on the import tariff, please review the Symbol Key in the back of the catalogue. If you have any questions, please contact tariffs@sothebys.com.


由於本拍品在 2020年9月1日之後進口到美國,所以買家可能需就本拍品支付進口關稅,金額為拍品進口美國當時申報價值的7.5%。除非您要求蘇富比安排運送拍品到美國境外之地址,否則發票上將包括18,750美元以及相關的銷售稅。如欲查詢進口關稅的更多信息,請查閱目錄背面的附錄。 如有任何疑問,敬請聯繫tariffs@sothebys.com。


For more information on and additional videos for this lot, please contact Randi.Yiu@sothebys.com.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


我們很高興為您提供上述拍品狀況報告。由於敝公司非專業修復人員,在此敦促您徵詢其他專業修復人員,以獲得更詳盡、專業之報告。


準買家應該檢查每件拍品以確認其狀況,蘇富比所作的任何陳述均為主觀看法而非事實陳述。雖然本狀況報告或有針對某拍品之討論,但所有拍賣品均根據印於圖錄內之業務規則以拍賣時狀況出售。

The present vase is one of the finest examples of black wares with ribbed decoration. The seemingly easy, yet highly effective method of decorating a black jar with parallel white lines was adopted by many northern kilns during the Song dynasty (960-1279). Qualities, shapes and details of the execution, however, vary considerably. Extant dark vessels with bright lines are mostly adorned in a relatively spontaneous manner. It is extremely rare to find an example with a finish as refined as that on present piece. The fine and straight white ribs, running in parallel all the way from the top to the bottom, point to the skillful control craftsmen were able to exert over the medium at the time.


However popular vessels of this design were, they usually came in the form of wide-mouthed jars with or without handles; pieces of the present form are extremely rare. This impressive shape, with small mouth, broad shoulders and wide base, is known as tuluping, or truncated meiping, and was used for storing wine. Usually consumed at a warm temperature, alcohol would have been transferred to a ewer or smaller bottle for pouring into the cup.


White-ribbed dark wares were mostly produced in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, at numerous kilns in Henan, Hebei, and Shandong provinces. Robert D. Mowry discusses this type of ware in detail in the catalogue to the exhibition Hare’s Fur, Tortoiseshell, and Partridge Feathers: Chinese Brown-and Black-Glazed Ceramics, 400-1400, Harvard University Art Museum, Cambridge, 1996. He suggests that ribs of white slip were first decoratively used during the Tang dynasty (618-907), on ceramics imitating lacquer or silver, mainly to segment the interiors of open-form vessels (p. 176). In the tenth and eleventh centuries they were sparingly added to the exteriors of vessels, before emerging as an important decorative scheme in their own right by the twelfth century. Although the kilns were mainly located in north China, the still very limited evidence from the various sites does not yet permit conclusive attribution of individual pieces to any particular kiln group.


Compare examples of similar design and form, but with a taller, waisted neck, including one now in the Asia Society, New York (accession no. 1979.143 ), included in the Harvard exhibition, ibid., cat. no. 62; another sold at Christie’s New York, 13th September 2018, lot 810; and a smaller vessel sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 30th November 2016, lot 3386.