View full screen - View 1 of Lot 116. An English cut-glass twelve-light chandelier, late 19th/early 20th century, in the manner of Perry & Co.
116

An English cut-glass twelve-light chandelier, late 19th/early 20th century, in the manner of Perry & Co

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

5,000

to
- 8,000 GBP

Property of a Gentleman

An English cut-glass twelve-light chandelier, late 19th/early 20th century, in the manner of Perry & Co

An English cut-glass twelve-light chandelier, late 19th/early 20th century, in the manner of Perry & Co

Estimate:

5,000

to
- 8,000 GBP

Lot sold:

10,080

GBP

Property of a Gentleman

An English cut-glass twelve-light chandelier

late 19th/early 20th century, in the manner of Perry & Co


the upper section with cross-hatched bowl issuing a curtain of faceted drops above a tier of glass flowers and a cross-hatched ball above further drops and festoons, with fourteen cut-glass nozzles on scrolled glass supports, the drip-pans with cascades of drops, the main shaft with a tapering cascade of drops ending in a cut-glass knop

167cm. high, 105cm. wide; 5ft. 5 3/4 in., 3ft. 5 1/4 in.

A grand chandelier in overall reasonable conserved condition entirely consistent with age. One arm with restored break. Typical minor chips and losses to cut-glass elements throughout and one nozzle with break to edge that will require attention. Some elements possibly replaced including drip pans which have been drilled for electricity and generally the chandelier will require installation by a professional. One or two missing elements including one two flower heads and various faceted drips to tiers beneath five of which are present and will need refixing. An impressive design and of superior quality that will clean up nicely and benefit from further conservation.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

The present lot is probably by Perry & Co. The boldly-cut lustres, scrolled glass branches, applied ‘flower-heads’ and in particular the vertical disc-form arrangement of glass ‘bars’ to a stage of the stem suggest these eminent English makers. The firm were renowned not only for their stunning creations but illustrious client list too. The present lot relates to examples in the collection at Chatsworth which were acquired by the 6th Duke of Devonshire for his London residence Devonshire House in the 1840s, notably for the Green Drawing Room and grand Salon. It is likely the firm also supplied a glass handrail, newel post and scrolled wall lights for the fabled ‘crystal staircase’ at the Mansion. The present lot appears though, to be from later in the firms output.


This leading manufacturer of chandeliers was founded in 1756 by William Parker, later becoming Parker & Perry before finally changing their name to Perry & Co., until closure of the business in 1935. The company provided fittings for Royal residences such as Carlton House and the Royal Pavilion, Brighton. Perry went onto re-work all the Carlton House chandeliers for Buckingham Palace. One of the most important series of chandeliers the company produced was for Goldsmith's Hall. George Perry in his letter accompanying the estimates to the livery company wrote ‘...we trust that our having made the greater part of the lustres for the late King, and our now being employed in making the those for the new Palace of his present majesty [William IV), will be some guarantee for the new character of our manufacture.’