View full screen - View 1 of Lot 63. Charles Frodsham No.1087. A giant gilt-brass repeating chronometer carriage clock, London, circa 1865.
63

Charles Frodsham No.1087. A giant gilt-brass repeating chronometer carriage clock, London, circa 1865

Estimate:

25,000 - 35,000 GBP

Charles Frodsham No.1087. A giant gilt-brass repeating chronometer carriage clock, London, circa 1865

Charles Frodsham No.1087. A giant gilt-brass repeating chronometer carriage clock, London, circa 1865

Estimate:

25,000 - 35,000 GBP

Lot sold:

30,240

GBP

Charles Frodsham No.1087. A giant gilt-brass repeating chronometer carriage clock, London, circa 1865


3¼-inch silvered dial signed Chas Frodsham, 84 Strand, 1087, Clock Maker to the Queen, engine-turned centre, subsidiary up/down dial, the gilt mask finely engraved with foliate scrolls, the movement with five ring-turned screwed pillars, chain fusees, Harrison's maintaining power, Earnshaw's spring detent escapement with free sprung split bi-metallic balance, blued helical spring and diamond endstone, mounted on a frosted gilt platform, repeat striking on a coiled gong, the fully signed and numbered backplate with strike/silent lever and silvered reversed chapter ring for seconds, the moulded case with reeded carrying handle and bevel-glazed panels, the shuttered rear panel with glazed seconds aperture

22cm 8¾in high

Dial in good condition. Movement is complete and running at time of cataloguing but is much in need of a clean and fresh oil. Case in generally good condition throughout with minor scuffs, marks and scratches comensurate with age. With a combined winder/hand set key.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. All dimensions in catalogue descriptions are approximate. Condition reports may not specify mechanical replacements or imperfections to the movement, case, dial, pendulum, separate base(s) or dome. Watches in water-resistant cases have been opened to examine movements but no warranties are made that the watches are currently water-resistant. Please note that we do not guarantee the authenticity of any individual component parts, such as wheels, hands, crowns, crystals, screws, bracelets and leather bands, since subsequent repairs and restoration work may have resulted in the replacement of original parts. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. In particular, please note it is the purchaser's responsibility to comply with any applicable import and export matters, particularly in relation to lots incorporating materials from endangered species.NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."


**Please be advised that bands made of materials derived from endangered or otherwise protected species (i.e. alligator and crocodile) are not sold with the watches and are for display purposes only. We reserve the right to remove these bands prior to shipping."

Charles Frodsham was born in London in 1810 into a family of chronometer, watch and clock makers. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed to his father, William James Frodsham FRS, a chronometer maker. Charles was obviously a talented craftsman because he entered two chronometers for trial at Greenwich, at the age of twenty, and won second prize.


By 1834 Charles had established his own business and ten years later, following the death of chronometer maker John Roger Arnold, he purchased Arnold's business and moved into Arnold's former premises at 84 Strand. Charles Frodsham went from strength to strength, exhibiting successfully at the Great Exhibition in 1851 and expanding further in 1854 with the purchase of the late Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy's business. Charles succeeded Vulliamy as Superintendent and Keeper of Her Majesty’s Clocks at Buckingham Palace and in 1855 served as Master of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers, a role he repeated in 1862. Charles Frodsham died in 1871 and was succeeded in the business by his son Harrison.


The present carriage clock is a fine example of a Frodsham domestic clock, combining the high precision and accuracy of timekeeping afforded by the chronometer escapement in a giant travel clock. The quality and attention to detail throughout is exceptional.