View full screen - View 1 of Lot 12. A Queen Anne walnut kneehole desk, early 18th century.
12

A Queen Anne walnut kneehole desk, early 18th century

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

3,000 - 5,000 GBP

Property from an English Private Collection

A Queen Anne walnut kneehole desk, early 18th century

A Queen Anne walnut kneehole desk, early 18th century

Estimate:

3,000 - 5,000 GBP

Lot sold:

4,032

GBP

Property from an English Private Collection

A Queen Anne walnut kneehole desk

early 18th century


the burr walnut top with cross-and-chevron banding with moulded edge above two frieze drawers and six short drawers with double bead mouldings around a central kneehole cupboard, the sides with brass carrying handles, on later bun feet

79.5cm. high, 88.5cm. wide, 54cm. deep; 2ft. 7½in., 2ft. 10⅝in., 1ft. 9¼in.

Of pleasing proportions and with attractively figured walnut veneers. This piece exhibits the kind of wear one would expect when its age is considered. This includes old marks and scratches and later bun feet. Ready to place. Interestingly the chevron banding appears to feature penwork to simulate grain. Hardware apparently original.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Acquired from Alexander George Fine Antiques Ltd.
Kneehole desks, referred to in contemporary inventories as 'burroes' or 'burrows' after the French bureau, emerged as a new form in the first decades of the 18th century and from an early date. Initially they appear to have served as dressing tables rather than writing desks and placed primarily in bedchambers and dressing rooms, such as the 'Dressing Buroe with Drawers' and the 'walnut-tree dressing buroe table' recorded in the Duchess of Chandos's Dressing Room and Chintz Bed Chamber at Cannons in 1725 (see Adam Bowett, English Furniture 1660-1714, From Charles II to Queen Anne, Antique Collectors Club, 2002, pp.120-23).