View full screen - View 1 of Lot 22. A pair of Chinese Export hardwood armchairs, probably Canton, circa 1760.
22

A pair of Chinese Export hardwood armchairs, probably Canton, circa 1760

VAT applies to hammer price and buyer's premiumUK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

25,000 - 35,000 GBP

A pair of Chinese Export hardwood armchairs, probably Canton, circa 1760

A pair of Chinese Export hardwood armchairs, probably Canton, circa 1760

Estimate:

25,000 - 35,000 GBP

A pair of Chinese Export hardwood armchairs

probably Canton, circa 1760


in late George II style, the pierced interlaced backsplat carved with eagle heads with outswept scrolled armrests, the drop-in seat on acanthus carved cabriole claw and ball front feet

In overall good condition. This hardwearing material displaying a few minor old marks, scuffs and scratches. Surface apparently re-polished however they retain a good colour and are ready to place.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

RELATED LITERATURE


Carl L. Crossman, The Decorative Arts of the China Trade: Paintings, furnishings and exotic curiosities, Woodbridge, 1991, pp. 220-234.

These chairs are a wonderful example of hardwood furniture manufactured in Canton for export which were modelled after English designs or prototypes. Furniture of this type was probably made to special order, perhaps for a member of the British East India Company posted in China or other company outposts. Interestingly, the design of the interlaced back splat - with scrolls terminating in eagle's heads - relates to a number of examples of Irish origin (see those illustrated The Knight of Glin and James Peill, Irish Furniture, Yale University Press, 2007, p. 213, figs. 38 & 39).