View full screen - View 1 of Lot 61. Declaration of Independence | Copied from the original Declaration of Independence in the Department of State.
61

Declaration of Independence | Copied from the original Declaration of Independence in the Department of State

Estimate:

9,000

to
- 12,000 USD

Declaration of Independence | Copied from the original Declaration of Independence in the Department of State

Declaration of Independence | Copied from the original Declaration of Independence in the Department of State

Estimate:

9,000

to
- 12,000 USD

Lot sold:

21,420

USD

Declaration of Independence 

In Congress, July 4th. 1776. The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America. [Washington]: Benjamin Owen Tyler, [1818]


Engraved broadside (760 x 612 mm). Printed on paper, by Peter Maverick of Newark, New Jersey, after Tyler; primarily marginal expert restoration, most prevalent to upper margin, tiny hole just touching one letter.


The first publication of the Declaration of Independence in the same form as the original


In the period following the War of 1812, Americans began to look back, for the first time with historical perspective, on the era of the founding of the country. The Republic was now forty years old, and the generation of the Revolution, including the Signers of the Declaration, was passing. With nostalgia and curiosity, many Americans began to examine the details of the nation's founding. Among other things, such documents as the debates of the Constitutional Convention were published for the first time. Others revisited the Declaration—not the often reprinted text, but the actual document itself, then preserved in the State Department, discovering remarkable differences between the original and the published versions. First, the title of the document was different (the manuscript original was as given above); secondly, the names of the Signers, now revered as the Founders, were omitted in all the published versions. It seemed extraordinary that the document, as created, was unknown to Americans, when the text was so central to the national identity.  


Benjamin Owen Tyler, a writing mater, decided to create a calligraphic version of the Declaration, giving the title and text exactly as it appeared in the original manuscript (although not directly copying its format), and then recreating exactly the signatures of the Signers as they appeared on the original. This he did to a remarkable degree. John Bidwell notes: "Tyler...retained every stroke and nuance of his models, preserving their proportions, stress, and weight...so convincing are his signatures that they masquerade as the originals in a recent book on American autographs...." Tyler won the endorsement of Secretary of State John Quincy Adams and, more importantly, that of the author of the Declaration, Thomas Jefferson, to whom his edition is dedicated. The Tyler facsimile was published on paper at five dollars, or on vellum at seven dollars. Only three copies on vellum survive. This is one of the copies printed on paper. 


REFERENCE

Bidwell, "American History in Image and Text" in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, 1988, Vol. 98, pp.247-302 

Condition as described in catalogue entry.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Please note, the description for lot 61 has been updated to the following: Engraved broadside (760 x 612 mm). Printed on paper, by Peter Maverick of Newark, New Jersey, after Tyler; primarily marginal expert restoration, most prevalent to upper margin, tiny hole just touching one letter.