View full screen - View 1 of Lot 47. A Set of Ten Regency Silver Dinner Plates from the Duke of Norfolk Service, Paul Storr, London, 1816.
47

A Set of Ten Regency Silver Dinner Plates from the Duke of Norfolk Service, Paul Storr, London, 1816

Estimate:

12,000 - 18,000 USD

Property from a Canadian Private Collection

A Set of Ten Regency Silver Dinner Plates from the Duke of Norfolk Service, Paul Storr, London, 1816

A Set of Ten Regency Silver Dinner Plates from the Duke of Norfolk Service, Paul Storr, London, 1816

Estimate:

12,000 - 18,000 USD

Lot sold:

15,120

USD

Property from a Canadian Private Collection


A Set of Ten Regency Silver Dinner Plates from the Duke of Norfolk Service, Paul Storr, London, 1816

richly chased borders with diaperwork and scalework between scrolling foliage, with fluted and gadrooned shell and foliate rims, each engraved with arms below a Duke's coronet

marked on bases


256 oz 5 dwt

7974 g

diameter 10 1/2 in.

26.7 cm

Surfaces with knife cuts and nicks from use, otherwise good condition.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Christie's London, June 10, 2010, lot 358

The arms are those of Howard quartered with Brotherton, Warren and Fitzalan, as borne by Bernard Edward, 12th Duke of Norfolk (1765-1842), who succeeded his cousin in 1815. He became a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1812 and a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1816. By Act of Parliament, June 24, 1824, he and his successors were empowered to exercise the office of Earl Marshall, notwithstanding their adhesion to the Roman Catholic faith. In 1829, he was admitted to his seat in the House of Lords, under the Roman Catholic Relief Bill. The 12th Duke married in 1789 Elizabeth, 3rd daughter of Henry (Belasyse), Earl Fauconberg. The 12th Duke died aged 76 at Norfolk House and was buried at Arundel Castle.


The present plates form part of the 12th Duke of Norfolk's extensive dinner service supplied by Rundells and noted for its richness of decoration and extravagant use of silver. The complete service, with the maker's mark of Paul Storr and hallmarks from 1808 to 1817, was divided between the Duke's grandsons, the 14th Duke of Norfolk and Edward, 1st Baron Howard. Their services, today at Carlton Towers in Yorkshire and at Arundel Castle, comprise six massive soup tureens, four wine coolers, twelve entrée dishes, and additional dinner plates and meat dishes. Over two thousand ounces of the service were sold in Christie's, New York on October 20, 1999, lot 241 and a further thirteen hundred ounces were sold Christie's, New York, October 19, 2001. Twelve plates from the service were sold from the Neil and Gina Smith Collection, Sotheby's, London, 3 July 2019, lot 129. Other pieces from the service are in the Gilbert Collection, Victoria and Albert Museum, London (T. Schroder, The Gilbert Collection of Gold and Silver, Los Angeles, 1988, pp.425-429) and the Detroit Museum of Arts, Detroit.