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131

Maine | “An Act relating to the Separation of the District of Maine from Massachusetts Proper...”

Maine | “An Act relating to the Separation of the District of Maine from Massachusetts Proper...”

Maine | “An Act relating to the Separation of the District of Maine from Massachusetts Proper...”

Maine

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By his Excellency John Brooks, Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A Proclamation. Whereas by an Act of the Legislature of this Commonwealth, passed on the nineteenth day of June last, entitled “An Act relating to the Separation of the District of Maine from Massachusetts Proper, and forming the same into a Separate and Independent State,” ... . [Boston: 1819]


Broadside (360 x 238 mm). Woodcut vignette of the Massachusetts seal at top, text in numerous fonts, remnants of wax seal, docketed on verso "Proclamation for Separation" and addressed "To the Selectmen of Fayette"; old folds, foxing, loss primarily to left margin, costing a few letters. Framed and glazed front and back; not examined out of frame. 


“Is it expedient, that the District of Maine shall become a Separate and Independent State, upon the terms and conditions provided in the Act aforesaid?”


In 1807, grievances over land settlements prompted Maine's residents, as well as their supporters in Massachusetts proper, for an 1807 vote in the Massachusetts Assembly on permitting Maine to secede. This vote ultimately failed. The desire to secede, however, did not wane. During the War of 1812, pro-British merchants in Massachusetts opposed the war, and also refused to defend Maine from British invaders, thus bolstering Maine's desire to form its own state. In 1819, Massachusetts agreed to permit secession, as declared in the present proclamation. 


Formal admission of Maine as the 23rd state occurred on 15 March 1820. This was a part of the Missouri Compromise, a piece of federal legislation that thwarted northern attempts to prevent the expansion of slavery. As a result of the Compromise, Missouri was admitted as a slave state, and Maine as a free state, in exchange for legislation that prohibited slavery in the remaining Louisiana Purchase lands north of the 36°30′ parallel.

Condition as described in catalogue entry.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.