View full screen - View 1 of Lot 55. A Nourouz still life, Persia, Qajar, 19th century.
55

A Nourouz still life, Persia, Qajar, 19th century

VAT applies to buyers outside the UK

Estimate:

8,000

to
- 12,000 GBP

A Nourouz still life, Persia, Qajar, 19th century

A Nourouz still life, Persia, Qajar, 19th century

Estimate:

8,000

to
- 12,000 GBP

Lot sold:

20,160

GBP

oil on canvas, framed


91 by 77cm.

Colours bright, losses to paint - notably visible under UV light - a central horizontal fold, and repaired U-shaped hole to centre, other various paint losses with associated repair to edges and most of middle section, please contact the department for images under UV light, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Very little is known of the development of the still-life genre in Iran. Layla Diba suggests that like eighteenth and nineteenth century portraiture, the Qajar still-life evolved from a Safavid prototype (L. Diba and M. Ekhtiar, Royal Persian Paintings: The Qajar Epoch 1785-1925, New York, 1998, p.214). The greatest still-life artist, Mirza Baba, flourished during the late eighteenth century and produced some of his finest works in the genre towards the end of the century. He was one of the most talented and influential of the early Qajar artists, and was already working for the Qajar family at Astarabad before they came to power, continuing in the service of Fath 'Ali Shah as emperor. Active until 1810 he was a versatile artist who produced small-scale illustrations for manuscripts, lacquer and the larger oil paintings for which he is best known. His works in oil depict a variety of subjects, but it was his innovation in the field of the still life that established him as the foremost exponent of the genre, fixing the format of the typical arrangement from then onwards, with the still life itself in the foreground and landscapes in the middle ground and far distance. The subject was often used to decorate reception rooms and garden pavilions, such as the Fin garden pavilion at Kashan (ibid, p.214).