View full screen - View 1 of Lot 16. Recto: A Seated River God with a Dolphin Verso: A Triton.
16

Toussaint Dubreuil

Recto: A Seated River God with a Dolphin Verso: A Triton

Drawings from the Collection of Carlos Alberto Cruz

Toussaint Dubreuil

Toussaint Dubreuil

Recto: A Seated River God with a Dolphin Verso: A Triton

Recto: A Seated River God with a Dolphin Verso: A Triton

Drawings from the Collection of Carlos Alberto Cruz

Toussaint Dubreuil

Paris circa 1560 - 1602

Recto: A Seated River God with a Dolphin

Verso: A Triton


Pen and black ink over traces of black chalk (recto and verso) with reddish-brown wash (recto) and some touches of pen and brown ink (verso)

299 by 168 mm

The paper has a number of small losses that have been restored. Two are to the right hand side from the center down towards the margin. The others are much smaller and towards the left margin. There is some light soiling especially around the edges and a few scattered brown small stains on the recto. Very small brown stains on the verso. The media is strong.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Don Pedro de A. Peña, Mallorca, by 1873;
sale, London, Christie's, 16 April 1999, lot 137 (as Spanish School 17th Century), where purchased by the present owner

This newly attributed double-sided sheet by Dubreuil can be closely compared with a drawing of Apollo killing Python, formerly in the collection of Philippe de Chennevières, now in the Bibliothèque nationale, Paris.1 Stylistically these two drawings are very similar in the delicate and elaborate use of the pen, with subtle indications of volumes contrasting with the firm contours of the figures.  The profile of the triton on the verso of the present sheet is particularly comparable with that of Apollo in the Bibliothèque nationale drawing.


On the recto of the present drawing, the outlines of the river god's body are executed with continuous lines strengthened by a variety of short cross-hatched and parallel strokes to define and emphasize the figure's knotted muscles and enhance the light falling from above to the left. Apart from the features of the face, this figure, with his slightly opened mouth and left hand pulling his long beard aside, is not unlike the Antique Warrior with a cuirass and a helmet nearby, in the Louvre.2  


The black ink used on both sides of the present sheet and in the Louvre drawing is found in a number of other studies by the artist, often, as here, in combination with black chalk, or together with red chalk, as in the Louvre sheet. Though the latter is more finished and elaborate it shows a similar emphasis on the chiaroscuro, achieved through darker and stronger strokes.


The watermark (Briquet 1581) is that of a French paper manufacturer of the early 1580s.


1. Paris, Bibliothèque nationale, Réserve B 5 (a boîte in-fol); see, B. Brejon de Lavergnée, Dessins français du XVIIe siècle, Bibliothèque nationale de France 2014, pp. 30-31, no. 4, reproduced

2. Paris, Louvre, inv. no. 26248; see D. Cordellier, Toussaint Dubreuil, exhib. cat., Musée du Louvre 2010, pp. 60-61, no. 9, reproduced, fig. 9