View full screen - View 1 of Lot 149. A LOUIS XV GILT BRONZE MANTEL CLOCK, CIRCA 1750.
149

A LOUIS XV GILT BRONZE MANTEL CLOCK, CIRCA 1750

Estimate:

20,000

to
- 30,000 USD

A LOUIS XV GILT BRONZE MANTEL CLOCK, CIRCA 1750

A LOUIS XV GILT BRONZE MANTEL CLOCK, CIRCA 1750

Estimate:

20,000

to
- 30,000 USD

Lot sold:

20,160

USD

A LOUIS XV GILT BRONZE MANTEL CLOCK, CIRCA 1750


in the form of a wild boar, the clock drum surmounted by a budgerigar; the enameled dial signed GILLE L'AINE A PARIS; anchor escapement with silk suspension, hour striking with horizontal hammer 

height 22 1/4 in.; width 18 in.; depth 7 1/2 in.

56.5 cm; 45.7 cm; 19.1 cm

The gilt bronze with some minor surface scratches, casting flaws, surface dust, and rubbing, as to be expected. Please note Sotheby's does not guarantee clock movements.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. All dimensions in catalogue descriptions are approximate. Condition reports may not specify mechanical replacements or imperfections to the movement, case, dial, pendulum, separate base(s) or dome. Watches in water-resistant cases have been opened to examine movements but no warranties are made that the watches are currently water-resistant. Please note that we do not guarantee the authenticity of any individual component parts, such as wheels, hands, crowns, crystals, screws, bracelets and leather bands, since subsequent repairs and restoration work may have resulted in the replacement of original parts. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. In particular, please note it is the purchaser's responsibility to comply with any applicable import and export matters, particularly in relation to lots incorporating materials from endangered species. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Pavillon Gabriel, Paris, 14 June 1977, lot 9
Partridge Fine Arts, London 2005

Non-invasive XRF testing of the base indicates an alloy composition consistent with bronzes produced in the 18th century.


The taste for exoticism in 18th-century French decorative arts was marked by an interest in the animal kingdom, and this was particularly manifest in the design for clock cases, which incorporated elephants, rhinoceroses, wild bulls and lions. Wild boar are less frequently encountered, although it was a subject that corresponded perfectly to the aristocratic pastime of hunting, a theme commonly depicted in the visual arts of the period.


A virtually identical clock with different birds on the cresting and a movement by Festeau was in the Roberto Polo collection, sold Sotheby's New York, 3 November 1989, lot 31, and an identical version to this model but with a patinated rather than gilt boar and movement by Sarton was sold Sotheby's Monaco, 25-26 June 1983, lot 85. Smaller casts of boar were used on musical clocks, including an example formerly in the Earls of Shelburne collection, sold Christie's London 9 December 2010, lot 256, and another very similar version illustrated in H. Ottomeyer and P. Pröschel, Vergoldete Bronzen: die Bronzearbeiten des Spätbarock und Klassizismus, Munich 1986, Vol. I. p.123 fig.2.8.4.


Pierre François Gille, known as Gille l'aîné (c.1690-1765), maître horloger in 1746, was based in the Rue Saint-Martin and provided clockworks to bronziers such as Osmond and Jean-Joseph de Saint-Germain, and for tall case clocks supplied leading ébénistes including Latz, Foullet and Marchand. He notably worked for the services of King August II of Saxony, Count Brühl, and the Prince de Condé