View full screen - View 1 of Lot 57. A GEORGE II CARVED GILTWOOD MIRROR, CIRCA 1735.
57

A GEORGE II CARVED GILTWOOD MIRROR, CIRCA 1735

A GEORGE II CARVED GILTWOOD MIRROR, CIRCA 1735

A GEORGE II CARVED GILTWOOD MIRROR, CIRCA 1735

This lot has been withdrawn

JAMB


A GEORGE II CARVED GILTWOOD MIRROR, CIRCA 1735


the scrolled pediment centred by a mask, the frame with a reserve between borders of acanthus and ribboned flower heads, with a female term to each side, re-gilt and plate re-silvered in the 19th century

150cm. high, 106cm. wide; 4ft. 11in., 3ft. 5 3/4in.


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A superb example of its type and generally very good. Typical movement to the joints. Some localised re-gilding and re-applied gilt paint. Minor losses to carved detail - see scrolled foliage of pediment, generally this does not detract. Chips and old marks entirely consistent with age to gilding and carving. Ingrained surface dirt to carved detail. Some loose elements. The back with evidence of former wall fixings. The aged plate looks great but is possibly a sympathetic replacement.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Formerly in the collection of Professor and Mrs Clifford Ambrose Truesdell

Headed by a bearded mask wearing a plumed crown and flanked by female hermed busts, this 'tabernacle' form pier mirror has all the hallmarks of the neo-Palladian style promoted by William Kent and his coterie of patrons. The quality of the carving, the treatment and design of the mask recall the work of James Richards who supplied Frederick, Prince of Wales with furniture for the Royal Gallery at Kew executed from the designs of Kent, illustrated in Adam Bowett, Early Georgian Furniture 1715-1740, Antique Collector's Club, 2009, p. 195, pl. 4:104. A related mirror supplied to Wentworth Woodhouse, Yorkshire is illustrated in Percy Macquoid and Ralph Edwards, The Dictionary of English Furniture, Rev. Ed. 1927, Vol. II, p. 328, fig. 54.