View full screen - View 1 of Lot 123. QUIRINGH GERRITSZ. VAN BREKELENKAM  |  INTERIOR WITH A GENTLEMAN PULLING ON HIS BOOTS, ATTENDED BY A PAGE.
123

QUIRINGH GERRITSZ. VAN BREKELENKAM | INTERIOR WITH A GENTLEMAN PULLING ON HIS BOOTS, ATTENDED BY A PAGE

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 USD

Property from Koetser Gallery, Zurich

QUIRINGH GERRITSZ. VAN BREKELENKAM | INTERIOR WITH A GENTLEMAN PULLING ON HIS BOOTS, ATTENDED BY A PAGE

QUIRINGH GERRITSZ. VAN BREKELENKAM | INTERIOR WITH A GENTLEMAN PULLING ON HIS BOOTS, ATTENDED BY A PAGE

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 USD

Lot sold:

56,250

USD

Property from Koetser Gallery, Zurich

QUIRINGH GERRITSZ. VAN BREKELENKAM

Zwammerdam circa 1622/30 - after 1669 Leiden

INTERIOR WITH A GENTLEMAN PULLING ON HIS BOOTS, ATTENDED BY A PAGE


signed and dated upper right on the four-poster bed: Q. Brekelenkam 1663

oil on canvas

unframed: 27¾ x 21 in.; 70.5 x 53.5 cm.

framed: 34 x 27⅝ in.; 86.4 x 70.2 cm.

The canvas is lined and stable on its stretcher. A detailed image reads well with bright whites retained and the signature scratched into the paint layer well preserved. The painting appears to have been recently varnished. Under UV inspection, very little retouching is visible under the varnish, with the exception of the area under the gentleman’s proper leg addressing an old tear or loss. A few tiny dots and strokes of retouching appear to be recently applied in the background at left. Overall the painting is in very good condition and can hang in its present state. Offered in a simply carved ebonized wood frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Sale Dr. H. Schulhof et al., Berlin, Lepke, 17/18 May 1892, lot 11;

Sale Dr. H. Goecke et al., Cologne, Heberle, 5/6 June 1893, lot 125; 

Sale Arthur Kay, London, Christie's, 11 May 1901, lot 13 (as dated 1661);

Sale Lord Swaythling, London, Christie's, 12 July 1946, lot 18; 

A. Weeker, London, 1951; 

The British Rail Pension Fund;

Sale Amsterdam, Sotheby’s, 18 November 1975, lot. 16;

With Gebr. Douwes Gallery, Amsterdam/London, 1976;

On loan to the Doncaster Museum & Art Gallery, England, 1977-1993;

Sale, The British Rail Pension Fund, London, Sotheby’s, December 1994, lot 20 (as monogrammed and dated 1661); 

With Gebr. Douwes, Amsterdam, 1995; 

Private collection, Netherlands;

Private collection, France.

S.J. Gudlaugsson, Gerard Ter Borgh, The Hague 1959/60, vol. II, p .278, under no. D21 (as incorrectly attributed to Ter Borch);

A. Lasius, Quiringh Gerritsz. van Brekelenkam, Ph.D. diss., p. 309, no. 90 (as dated 1661);

A. Lasius, Quiringh van Brekelenkam, Doornspijk 1992, pp. 105-6, no. 90 (as monogrammed and dated 1661).

Delft, Fine Art Fair, 1976 (lent by Gebr. Douwes);

On loan to the Doncaster Museum & Art Gallery, England, 1977-1993.

"What I admire most about this genre painting is its candid representation of an upper middle class Dutch interior, with the furnishing we recognize from Holland’s Golden Age. We are reminded that in this period there were no bedrooms per se, but the four poster bed with its heavy protective curtains was often situated in the living room, not far from the warmth of the family hearth. A man pulls on his boots, while a young boy waits patiently beside him, holding the man's broad brimmed hat. We feel that we are catching a glimpse of family life during an unimportant, everyday moment, which is, after all, the essential appeal of genre painting."


Otto Naumann


Quiringh Gerritsz. van Brekelenkam probably trained with the celebrated Leiden fijnschilder Gerard Dou, and like Dou he elevated everyday subjects to refined and elegant scenes. Although his first known painting is dated 1644, he was only admitted to the Leiden guild in 1648, and lived and worked there until his death. This picture dates from Brekelenkam’s most productive period, between 1660 and 1664, when he painted higher quality pictures, and dated his works more frequently, than before or after. Lasius (see Literature) suggests that this may have been because both Gabriel Metsu and Jan Steen had left Leiden, so that Brekelenkam had a more dominant position in the local market for genre pictures.1


In the present painting a man pulls on his boots as a young boy waits to hand him his felt hat. Seventeenth century Dutch homes typically did not include separate bedrooms, and the four-poster bed in the background of the living area gives it a cozy ambiance. The paintings hanging on the rear wall indicate that this family home belongs to the upper-middle class, which was constantly growing in the Dutch Golden Age.



1. A. Lasius, Quiringh van Brekelenkam, Doornspijk 1992, p. 70.