View full screen - View 1 of Lot 1. PHILIPPE ROUSSEAU  |  A STILL LIFE WITH PIGEONS IN A ROOSTING HOUSE IN A TREETOP; AND A STILL LIFE WITH PARROTS AND A MONKEY PERCHED ON THE BRANCHES OF A GRAPEVINE .
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PHILIPPE ROUSSEAU | A STILL LIFE WITH PIGEONS IN A ROOSTING HOUSE IN A TREETOP; AND A STILL LIFE WITH PARROTS AND A MONKEY PERCHED ON THE BRANCHES OF A GRAPEVINE

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 50,000 GBP

Property from Didier Aaron, Paris, New York & London

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PHILIPPE ROUSSEAU | A STILL LIFE WITH PIGEONS IN A ROOSTING HOUSE IN A TREETOP; AND A STILL LIFE WITH PARROTS AND A MONKEY PERCHED ON THE BRANCHES OF A GRAPEVINE

PHILIPPE ROUSSEAU | A STILL LIFE WITH PIGEONS IN A ROOSTING HOUSE IN A TREETOP; AND A STILL LIFE WITH PARROTS AND A MONKEY PERCHED ON THE BRANCHES OF A GRAPEVINE

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 50,000 GBP

Property from Didier Aaron, Paris, New York & London

PHILIPPE ROUSSEAU

Paris 1816 - 1887 Acquigny

A STILL LIFE WITH PIGEONS IN A ROOSTING HOUSE IN A TREETOP; AND A STILL LIFE WITH PARROTS AND A MONKEY PERCHED ON THE BRANCHES OF A GRAPEVINE 


the formed signed lower left: Ph. Rousseau

the latter signed and dated lower right: Ph. Rousseau. 57

a pair, both oil on canvas 

unframed: 127.1 x 87 cm.; 50 x 34 1/4 in.

framed: 156.9 x 118.2 cm.; 61 3/4 x 46 3/8 in.

(2)


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The former: The canvas is lined, the painting surface is clean and the varnish is clear and even. Inspection under ultraviolet light reveals few retouchings. There are some small retouchings in the flying pigeon upper right and in the sky around the dovecote and in the background lower centre. There are very scarce, minor retouchings around all four margins.

 

The latter: The canvas is lined, the paint surface is clean and the varnish is clear and even. Much of the impasto paintwork is very well preserved particularly in the macaw's feathers. There is a small paint loss in the sky upper centre. Inspection under ultraviolet light reveals very few, minor, scattered retouchings.

 

Both in overall very good condition.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Paris, Salon, 1857, nos 2334 and 2335.

“Is it possible to capture the personality of pigeons and parrots in paint? I believe Rousseau has done it here: the lively brushwork, vivid colors, and action-filled compositions are begging for a soundtrack as we see the birds interacting with each other in such a charming, spirited manner.” 

 

Calvine Harvey


These paintings were exhibited at the Salon of 1857, during which Rousseau presented more paintings than ever before (ten). They were singled out by several critics, such as Edmond About, who wrote: 'Animals are, for Mr. Rousseau, knowledgeable little beings; each of his compositions resembles an outdoor theatre framing animals performing plays for us' (Nos artistes au Salon de 1857, pp. 351–52). The light, lively touch used to construct the multicolored plumage of the birds; the acuity in his realistic description of the animals; and other elements in the still lifes, such as the gentle light that suffuses the scenes, and the sense – tinged with humour – of anecdote at work in these paintings, are all typical of the artist.