View full screen - View 1 of Lot 45. An Egyptian Limestone Sarcophagus Mask, 30th Dynasty/early Ptolemaic Period, circa 380-250 B.C..
45

An Egyptian Limestone Sarcophagus Mask, 30th Dynasty/early Ptolemaic Period, circa 380-250 B.C.

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

75,000

to
- 125,000 GBP

An Egyptian Limestone Sarcophagus Mask, 30th Dynasty/early Ptolemaic Period, circa 380-250 B.C.

An Egyptian Limestone Sarcophagus Mask, 30th Dynasty/early Ptolemaic Period, circa 380-250 B.C.

Estimate:

75,000

to
- 125,000 GBP

An Egyptian Limestone Sarcophagus Mask

30th Dynasty/early Ptolemaic Period, circa 380-250 B.C.


from the lid of a large anthropoid sarcophagus, wearing a wide tripartite wig, the idealized face with full outlined lips, straight nose, and almond-shaped eyes with long contoured eyebrows and cosmetic lines in relief; remains of blue and black pigment.

43.2 by 51 cm.

Very good. Remains of red pigment on philtrum, inside nostrils and mouth, above eyes, and over ears. Remains of black pigment on raised eyebrows. Blue pigment on wig preserved mostly around face and on proper left side.

Tip of nose and nostrils darkened from rubbing.

Mounted in back for hanging on wall.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Jean-Loup Despras, Galerie Orient-Occident, Paris
David Stickelber (1928-2011), Kansas City, Missouri, acquired from the above in the late 1970s/early 1980s
the estate of David Stickelber (Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Chicago, November 8th, 2012, no. 207, illus.)
Galerie Chenel, Paris, acquired at the above sale
American private collection, acquired from the above
acquired from the above in 2018

Cf. Sue D’Auria, Peter Lacovara, and Catharine H. Roehrig, Mummies & Magic, The Funerary Arts of Ancient Egypt, Boston, 1988, p. 193, no. 139, for a similar sarcophagus mask slightly later in date. The author writes that it "belongs to a class that evolved in Dynasty 30, and continued in use well into the Ptolemaic Period. Some dated examples were found by Petrie in Cemetery B at Abydos, belonging to Dynasty 30, and later sarcophagi of the same type are recorded from Qau and Akhmim. They usually bear inscriptions down the front in vertical columns, and additional decoration could be provided at the sides in the form of representations of the Four Sons of Horus or other funerary deities. Large wesekh-collars with falcon-headed terminals are also a feature of certain examples of this type of sarcophagus. Many uninscribed sarcophagi of this shape and material are known; they may be unfinished, or the painted decoration has not survived."


A closely related complete sarcophagus lid, 72 inches high, inscribed for its owner Pedienese and dated to 350 B.C., is in the British Museum, inv. no. EA34 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qmgv2NihVTg).